c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Sat, 04 Mar 2017

Official(ish) deep dark onion code::j0rg3 mirror

Recently I decided that I wanted my blog to be available inside of the Deep, Dark Onion (Tor).

First time around, I set up a proxy that I modified to access only the clear web version of the blog and to avail that inside Tor as a ‘hidden service’.

My blog is hosted on equipment provided by the kind folk at insomnia247.nl and I found that, within a week or so, the address of my proxy was blocked. It’s safe for us to assume that it was simply because of the outrageous popularity it received inside Tor.

By “safe for us to assume” I mean that it is highly probable that no significant harm would come from making that assumption. It would not be a correct assumption, though.

What’s more true is that within Tor things are pretty durn anonymous. Your logs will show Tor traffic coming from 127.0.0.1 only. This is a great situation for parties that would like to scan sites repeatedly looking for vulnerabilities — because you can’t block them. They can scan your site over and over and over. And the more features you have (e.g., comments, searches, any form of user input), the more attack vectors are plausible.

So why not scan endlessly? They do. Every minute of every hour.

Since insomnia247 is a provider of free shells, it is incredibly reasonable that they don’t want to take the hit for that volume of traffic. They’re providing this service to untold numbers of other users, blogs and projects.

For that reason, I decided to set up a dedicated mirror.

Works like this: my blog lives here. I have a machine at home which uses rsync to make a local copy of this blog. Immediately thereafter it rsyncs any newly gotten data up to the mirror in onionland.

After consideration, I realized that this was also a better choice just in case there is something exploitable in my blog. Instead of even risking the possibility that an attacker could get access to insomnia247, they can only get to my completely disposable VPS which has hardly anything on it except this blog and a few scripts to which I’ve already opened the source code.

I’ve not finished combing through but I’ve taken efforts to ensure it doesn’t link back to clear web. To be clear, there’s nothing inherently wrong with that. Tor users will only appear as the IP address of their exit node and should still remain anonymous. To me, it’s just onion etiquette. You let the end-user decide when they want to step outside.

To that end, the Tor mirror does not have the buttons to share to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Plus.

That being said, if you’re a lurker of those Internet back-alleys then you can find the mirror at: http://aacnshdurq6ihmcs.onion

Happy hacking, friends!


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Permalink: 20170304.deep.dark.onion

Sat, 25 Jan 2014

Network-aware Synergy client

My primary machines are *nix or BSD variants, though I certainly have some Windows-based rigs also. Today we’re going to share some love with Windows 7 and PowerShell.

One of my favorite utilities is Synergy. If you’re not already familiar it allows to you seamlessly move from the desktop of one computer to another with the same keyboard and mouse. It even supports the clipboard so you might copy text from a GNU/Linux box and paste it in a Windows’ window. Possibly, they have finished adding drag and drop to the newer versions. I am not sure because I run a relatively old version that is supported by all of the machines that I use regularly.

What’s the problem, then? The problem was that I was starting my Synergy client by hand. Even more disturbing, I was manually typing the IP address at work and at home, twice or more per weekday. This behavior became automated by my brain and continued for months unnoticed. But this is no kind of life for a geek such as myself, what with all this superfluous clicking and tapping!

Today, we set things right!

In my situation, the networks that I use happen to assign IP addresses from different subnets. If you’ve not the convenience of that situation then you might need to add something to the script. Parsing an ipconfig/ifconfig command, you could possibly use something like the Default Gateway or the Connection-specific DNS Suffix. Alternatively, you could check for the presence of some network share, a file on server or anything that would allow you to uniquely identify the surroundings.

As I imagined it, I wanted the script to accomplish the following things

  • see if Synergy is running (possibly from the last location), if so ask if we need to kill it and restart so we can identify a new server
  • attempt to locate where we are and connect to the correct Synergy server
  • if the location is not identified, ask whether to start the Synergy client

This is how I accomplished that task:

# [void] simply supresses the noise made loading 'System.Reflection.Assembly'
[void] [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.Windows.Forms")

# Define Synergy server IP addresses
$synergyServerWork = "192.168.111.11"
$synergyServerHome = "192.168.222.22"

# Define partial IP addresses that will indicate which server to use
$synergyWorkSubnets = "192.168.111", "192.168.115"
$synergyHomeSubnets = "192.168.222", "192.168.225"

# Path to Synergy Client (synergyc)
$synergyClientProgram = "C:\Program Files\Synergy\synergyc.exe"

# Path to Syngery launcher, for when we cannot identify the network
$synergyLauncherProgram = "C:\Program Files\Synergy\launcher.exe"

# Remove path and file extension to give us the process name
$processName = $synergyClientProgram.Substring( ($synergyClientProgram.lastindexof("\") + 1), ($synergyClientProgram.length - ($synergyClientProgram.lastindexof("\") + 5) ))

# Grab current IP address
$currentIPaddress = ((ipconfig | findstr [0-9].\.)[0]).Split()[-1]

# Find the subnet of current IP address
$location = $currentIPaddress.Substring(0,$currentIPaddress.lastindexof("."))


function BalloonTip ($message)
{
# Pop-up message from System Tray
$objNotifyIcon = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.NotifyIcon
$objNotifyIcon.Icon = [System.Drawing.Icon]::ExtractAssociatedIcon($synergyClientProgram)
$objNotifyIcon.BalloonTipText = $message
$objNotifyIcon.Visible = $True
$objNotifyIcon.ShowBalloonTip(15000)
}


#main

# If Synergy client is already running, do we need to restart it?
$running = Get-Process $processName -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
if ($running) {
$answer = [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show("Synergy is running.`nClose and start again?", "OHNOES", 4)
if ($answer -eq "YES") {
Stop-Process -name $processName
}
Else {
exit
}
}

# Do we recognize the current network?
if ($synergyWorkSubnets -contains $location) {
BalloonTip "IP: $($currentIPaddress)`nServer: $($synergyServerWork)`nConnecting to Synergy server at work."
& $synergyClientProgram $synergyServerWork
exit
}
ElseIf ($synergyHomeSubnets -contains $location) {
BalloonTip "IP: $($currentIPaddress)`nServer: $($synergyServerHome)`nConnecting to Synergy server at home."
& $synergyClientProgram $synergyServerHome
exit
}
Else {
$answer = [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show("Network not recognized by IP address: {0}`n`nLaunch Synergy?" -f $unrecognized, "OHNOES", 4)
if ($answer -eq "YES") {
& $synergyLauncherProgram
}
}

Then I saved the script in "C:\Program Files\SynergyStart\", created a shortcut and used the Change Icon button to make the same as Synergy’s and made the Target:
C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe -WindowStyle Hidden & 'C:\Program Files\SynergyStart\synergy.ps1'

Lastly, I copied the shortcut into the directory of things that run when the system starts up:
%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

Now, Synergy connects to the needed server at home and work. If it can’t figure out where it is, it asks if it should run it at all.

As they say, a millisecond saved is a millisecond earned.

This post was very nearly published without a Linux equivalent. Nearly.

Same trick for bash/zsh: #!/bin/zsh

# Define Synergy server IP addresses
synergyServerWork="192.168.111.11"
synergyServerHome="192.168.222.22"

# Define partial IP addresses that will indicate which server to use
synergyWorkSubnets=("192.168.111" "192.168.115")
synergyHomeSubnets=("192.168.222" "192.168.225")

# Path to Synergy Client (synergyc)
synergyClientProgram="/usr/bin/synergyc"

# Path to QuickSyngery, for when we cannot identify the network
synergyLauncherProgram="/usr/bin/quicksynergy"

# Remove path and file extension to give us the process name
processName=`basename $synergyClientProgram`

# Grab current IP address, assumes '192' is in use. (e.g., 192.168.1.1)
currentIPaddress=`ip addr show | grep 192 | awk "{print $2}" | sed 's/inet //;s/\/.*//;s/ //g'`

# Find the subnet of current IP address
location=`echo $currentIPaddress | cut -d '.' -f 1,2,3`

for i in "${synergyWorkSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
break
fi
done

#main

# If Synergy client is already running, do we need to restart it?
running=`ps ax | grep -v grep | grep $processName`
if [ $running ]
then
if `zenity --question --ok-label="Yes" --cancel-label="No" --text="Synergy is running.\nClose and start again?"`
then
pkill $processName
else
exit
fi
fi

# Do we recognize the current network?
for i in "${synergyWorkSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
notify-send "IP:$currentIPaddress Server:$synergyServerWork [WORK]"
$synergyClientProgram $synergyServerWork
exit
fi
done

for i in "${synergyHomeSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
notify-send "IP:$currentIPaddress Server:$synergyServerWork [HOME]"
$synergyClientProgram $synergyServerHome
exit
fi
done

if `zenity --question --ok-label="Yes" --cancel-label="No" --text="Network not recognized by IP address: $currentIPaddress\nLaunch Synergy?"`
then
$synergyLauncherProgram
fi

To get it to run automatically, you might choose to call the script from /etc/init.d/rc.local.

Download here:
  PowerShell:
    synergy.ps1
  GNU/Linux:
    synergy.sh


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Permalink: 20140125.network_aware_synergy_client

Wed, 26 Jun 2013

Terminal suddenly Chinese

The other day, I was updating one of my systems and I noticed that it had decided to communicate with me in Chinese. Since I don’t know a lick of Chinese, it made for a clumsy exchange.

It was Linux Mint (an Ubuntu variant), so a snip of the output from an ‘apt-get upgrade’ looked like this: terminal screen with Chinese characters

I’m pretty sure I caused it — but there’s no telling what I was working on and how it slipped past me. Anyway, it’s not a difficult problem to fix but I imagine it could look like big trouble.

So, here’s what I did:
> locale

The important part of the output was this:
LANG=en_US.UTF-8
LANGUAGE=zh_CN.UTF-8

If you want to set your system to use a specific editor, you can set $EDITOR=vi and then you’re going to learn that some programs expect the configuration to be set in $VISUAL and you’ll need to change it there too.

In a similar way, many things were using the en_US.UTF-8 set in LANG, but other things were looking to LANGUAGE and determining that I wanted Chinese.

Having identified the problem, the fix was simple. Firstly, I just changed it in my local environment:
> LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8

That solved the immediate problem but, sooner or later, I’m going to reboot the machine and the Chinese setting would have come back. I needed to record the change somewhere for the system to know about it in the future.

> vim /etc/default/locale

Therein was the more permanent record, so I changed LANGUAGE there also, giving the result:

LANG=en_US.UTF-8
LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8
LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8
LC_NUMERIC=en_US.UTF-8
LC_TIME=en_US.UTF-8
LC_COLLATE=”en_US.UTF-8”
LC_MONETARY=en_US.UTF-8
LC_MESSAGES=”en_US.UTF-8”
LC_PAPER=en_US.UTF-8
LC_NAME=en_US.UTF-8
LC_ADDRESS=en_US.UTF-8
LC_TELEPHONE=en_US.UTF-8
LC_MEASUREMENT=en_US.UTF-8
LC_IDENTIFICATION=en_US.UTF-8
LC_ALL=

And now, the computer is back to using characters that I (more-or-less) understand.


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Permalink: 20130626.terminal.suddenly.chinese

Thu, 06 Jun 2013

Managing to use man pages through simple CLI tips

Recently, an author I admire and time-honored spinner of the Interwebs, Tony Lawrence emphasized the value of using man pagesmanual pagesDocumentation available from the command line.
> man ls
as a sanity check before getting carried away with powerful commands. I didn’t know about this one but he has written about a situation in which killall could produce some shocking, and potentially quite unpleasant, results.

Personally, I often quickly check man pages to be certain that I am using the correct flags or, as in the above case, anticipating results that bear some resemblance to what is actually likely to happen. Yet, it seems many people flock toward SERPSearch Engine Results Page A tasteful replacement for mentioning any particular search-engine by name.
Also useful as a verb:
I dunno. You’ll have to SERP it.
s for this information.

Perhaps the most compelling reason to head for the web is leaving the cursor amid the line you’re working on, without disturbing the command. SERPing the command however, could easily lead you to information about a variant that is more common than the one available to you. More importantly, the information retrieved from the search engine is almost certainly written by someone who did read the man page — and may even come with the admonishment that you RTFMRead The F#!$!*#’n Manual as a testament to the importance of developing this habit.

This can be made easier with just a few CLI shortcuts.

<CTRL+u> to cut what you have typed so far and <CTRL+y> to paste it back.

That is, you press <CTRL+u> and the line will be cleared, so you can then type man {command} and read the documentation. Don’t hesitate to jot quick notes of which flags you intend to use, if needed. Then exit the man page, press <CTRL+y> and finish typing right where you left off.

This is another good use for screen or tmux but let’s face it. There are times when you don’t want the overhead of opening another window for a quick look-up and even instances when these tools aren’t available.

A few other tips to make life easier when building complex commands:

Use the command fc to open up an editor in which you can build your complex command and, optionally, even save it as a shell script for future reuse.

Repeat the last word from the previous command (often a filename) with <ALT+.> or use an item from the last command by position, in reverse order:
> ls -lahtr *archive*
<ALT+1+.> : *archive*
<ALT+2+.> : -lahtr
<ALT+3+.> : ls

You can also use Word Designators to use items from history, such as adding sudo to the last command typed by:
sudo !!

This allows for tricks like replacing bits of a previous command:
!:s/misspelled/corrected/

Lastly, if you need a command that was typed earlier, you can search history by pressing <CTRL+r> and start typing an identifying portion of the command.

(Note: I have used these in Zsh and Bash, specifically. They can, however, be missing or overwritten — if a feature you want isn’t working, you can bind keys in a configuration file. Don’t just write it off, once you’ve solved the problem it will never again be an intimidating one.)

Happy hacking!


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Permalink: 20130606.managing.to.use.man.pages

Tue, 07 May 2013

Welcome, traveler.

Thanks for visiting my little spot on the web. This is a Blosxom ‘blog which, for those who don’t know, is a CGI written in Perl using the file-system (rather than a database).

To the CLI-addicted, this is an awesome little product. Accepting, of course, that you’re going to get under the hood if you’re going to make it the product you want. After some modules and hacking, I’m pleased with the result.

My posts are just text files, meaning I start a new one like: vim ~posts/`date +%Y%m%d`.brief.subject.txt

Note: the back-ticks (`) tell the system that you want to execute the command between ticks, and dynamically insert its output into the command. In this case, the command date with these parameters:
  1. (+) we’re going to specify a format
  2. (%Y) four-digit year
  3. (%m) two-digit month
  4. (%d) two-digit day
That means the command above will use Vim to edit a text file named ‘20130507.brief.subject.txt’ in the directory I have assigned to the hash of ‘posts’. (using hash this way is a function of Zsh that I’ll cover in another post)

In my CLI-oriented ‘blog, I can sprinkle in my own HTML or use common notation like wrapping a word in underscores to have it underlined, forward-slashes for italics and asterisks for bold.

Toss in a line that identifies tags and, since Perl is the beast of Regex, we pick up the tags and make them links, meta-tags, etc.

Things here are likely to change a lot at first, while I twiddle with CSS and hack away at making a Blosxom that perfectly fits my tastes — so don’t be too alarmed if you visit and things look a tad wonky. It just means that I’m tinkering.

Once the saw-horses have been tucked away, I’m going to take the various notes I’ve made during my years in IT and write them out, in a very simple breakdown, aimed at sharing these with people who know little about how to negotiate the command line. The assumption here is that you have an interest in *nix/BSD. If you’ve that and the CLI is not a major part of your computing experience, it probably will be at some point. If you’re working on systems remotely, graphical interfaces often just impede you.

Once you’ve started working on remote machines, the rest is inevitable. You can either remember how to do everything two ways, through a graphical interface and CLI — or just start using the CLI for everything.

So let’s take a little journey through the kinds of things that make me love the CLI.


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Permalink: 20130507.greetings