c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Tue, 18 Mar 2014

Random datums with Random.org

I was reading about the vulnerability in the ‘random’ number generator in iOS 7 (http://threatpost.com/weak-random-number-generator-threatens-ios-7-kernel-exploit-mitigations/104757) and thought I would share a method that I’ve used. Though, I certainly was not on any version of iOS but, at least, I can help in GNU/Linux and BSDs.

What if we want to get some random numbers or strings? We need a salt or something and, in the interest of best practices, we’re trying to restrain the trust given to any single participant in the chain. That is, we do not want to generate the random data from the server that we are on. Let’s make it somewhere else!

YEAH! I know, right? Where to get a random data can be a headache-inducing challenge. Alas! The noble people at Random.org are using atmospheric noise to provide randomness for us regular folk!

Let’s head over and ask for some randomness:
https://www.random.org/strings/?num=1&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=html&rnd=new

Great! Still feels a little plain. What if big brother saw the string coming over and knew what I was doing? I mean, aside from the fact that I could easily wrap the string with other data of my choosing.

Random.org is really generous with the random data, so why don’t we take advantage of that? Instead of asking for a single string, let’s ask for several. Nobunny will know which one I picked, except for me!

We’ll do that by increasing the 'num' part of the request that we’re sending:
https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=html&rnd=new

They were also thinking of CLI geeks like us with the 'format' variable. We set that to 'plain' and all the fancy formatting for human eyes is dropped and we get a simple list that we don’t need to use any clever tricks to parse!
curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new'

Now we’ve got 25 strings at the CLI. We can pick one to copy and paste. But what if we don’t want to do the picking? Well, we can use the local system to do that. We’ll have it pick a number between 1 and 25. It’s zero-indexed, so we’re going to increment by 1 so that our number is really between 1 and 25.
echo $(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 ))

Next, we’ll send our list to head with our random number. Head is going to give us the first X lines of what we send to it. So if our random number is 17, then it will give us the first 17 lines from Random.org
curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new' | head -$(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 ))

After that, we’ll use the friend of head: tail. We’ll tell tail that we want only the last record of the list, of psuedo-random length, of strings that are random.
curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new' | head -$(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 )) | tail -1

And we can walk away feeling pretty good about having gotten some properly random data for our needs!


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Permalink: 20140318.random.data

Wed, 15 May 2013

Git: an untracked mess?

There may be times when you find your Git repository burdened with scads of untracked files left aside while twiddling, testing bug patches, or what-have-youse.

For the especially scatter-brained among us, these things can go unchecked until a day when the useful bits of a git status scroll off the screen due to utterly unimportant stuff. Well, hopefully unimportant.

But we’d better not just cleave away everything that we haven’t checked in. You wonder:
What if there’s something important in one of those files?

You are so right!

Let’s fix this!

Firstly, we want a solution that’s reproducible. Only want to invent this wheel once, right?

Let’s begin with the play-by-play:

Git, we want a list of what isn’t tracked: git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z

We’ll back these files up in our home directory (~), using CPIO but we don’t want a poorly-named directory or finding anything will become its own obstacle. So we’ll take use the current date (date +%Y-%m-%d), directory (pwd) and branch we’re using (git branch) and we’ll twist all of it into a meaningful, but appropriate, directory name using sed. git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/

Then Tell Git to remove the untracked files and directories: git clean -d -f

Ahhhh… Much better. Is there anything left out? Perhaps. What if we decide that moving these files away was a mistake? The kind of mistake that breaks something. If we realize right away, it’s easily-enough undone. But what if we break something and don’t notice for a week or two? It’d probably be best if we had an automated script to put things back the way they were. Let’s do that.

Simple enough. We’ll just take the opposite commands and echo them into a script to be used in case of emergency.

Create the restore script (restore.sh), to excuse faulty memory: echo "(cd ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Make the restore script executable: chmod u+x ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Lastly, the magic, compressed into one line that will stop if any command does not report success: a='untracked-git-backup-'`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`; git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/$a/ && git clean -d -f && echo "(cd ~/$a/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/$a/restore.sh && chmod +x ~/$a/restore.sh; unset a


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Permalink: 20130515.git.untracked.mess

Mon, 13 May 2013

Zsh and hash

Documentation for this one seems a bit hard to come by but it is one of the things I love about Zsh.

I’ve seen many .bashrc files that have things like:
alias www='cd /var/www'
alias music='cd /home/j0rg3/music'

And that’s a perfectly sensible way to make life a little easier, especially if the paths are very long.

In Zsh, however, we can use the hash command and the shortcut we get from it works fully as the path. Other words, using the version above, if we want to edit ‘index.html’ in the ‘www’ directory, we would have to issue the shortcut to get there and then edit the file, in two steps:
> www
> vim index.html

The improved version in .zshrc would look like:
hash www=/var/www
hash -d www=/var/www

Then, at any time, you can use tilde (~) and your shortcut in place of path.
> vim ~www/index.html

Even better, it integrates with Zsh’s robust completions so you can, for example, type cd ~www/ and then use the tab key to cycle through subdirectories and files.

On this system, I’m using something like this:
(.zshrc)
hash posts=/home/j0rg3/weblog/posts
hash -d posts=/home/j0rg3/weblog/posts

Then we can make a function to create a new post, to paste into .zshrc. Since we want to be able to edit and save, without partial posts becoming visible, while we are working, we’ll use an extra .tmp extension at the end:
post() { vim ~posts/`date +%Y-%m`/`date +%Y%m%d`.$1.txt.tmp }

[ In-line date command unfamiliar? See earlier explanation ]

But, surely there is going to be a point when we need to save a post and finish it later. For now, let’s assume that only a single post will be in limbo at any time. We definitely don’t want to have to remember the exact name of the post — and we don’t want to have hunt it down every time.

We can make those things easier like this:
alias resume="vim `find ~posts/ -name '*.txt.tmp'`"

Now, we can just enter resume and the system will go find the post we were working on and open it up for us to finish. The file will need the extension renamed from .txt.tmp to only .txt to publish the post but, for the sake of brevity, we’ll think about that (and having multiple posts in editing) on another day.


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Permalink: 20130513.zsh.and.hash

Wed, 08 May 2013

Deleting backup files left behind by Vim

It’s generally a great idea to have Vim keep backups. Once in awhile, they can really save your bacon.

The other side of that coin, though, is that they can get left behind here and there, eventually causing aggravation.

Here’s a snippet to find and eliminate those files from the current directory down:

find ./ -name '*~' -exec rm '{}' \; -print -or -name ".*~" -exec rm {} \; -print
This uses find from the current directory down (./) to execute an rm statement on all files with an extension ending in tilde (~)
Alternatively, you could just store your backups elsewhere. In Vim, use :help backupdir for more information.


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Permalink: 20130508.delete.vim.backups