c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Tue, 07 Mar 2017

Privacy Part II: VPN/IPVanish - Install IPVanish on Kali Linux

Okay, so you’re running Whonix, Tails or, at least, TorBrowser.

What’s next? You may wish to consider using a VPN. In simple terms, it’s somewhat similar to what Tor offers. That is: you connect to the VPN and your connection passes through them such that the site that you are visiting will see the VPN’s IP address rather than yours. Of course, that means that you can chain them.

That is: (You)->VPN->Tor->Exit node->Web site

The reason that you might feel compelled to take this step is that a party which is able to see your traffic into and out of Tor could still identify you. The thinking is that the parties who wish to interfere with your privacy could be compelled to run Tor bridges, relays and exit nodes. If traffic from your IP address could be matched to requests coming from the Tor exit node then you could, effectively, be identified.

Some people hold that using a VPN to access Tor does not improve your anonymousness. I am not among them. In particular, you will find that IPVanish offers VPN service for under $7 per month and is popular among users of the Tor network. Which means that in addition to the fact that IPVanish is not logging your traffic, there’s an excellent chance that other users are going from IPVanish into Tor, helping to reduce the uniqueness of your traffic.

By the way, I’d suggest poking around the web a little bit. While their prices are already great you can find some even deeper discounts: https://signup.ipvanish.com/?aff=vpnfan-promo

IPVanish’s site offers instructions for installing the VPN in Ubuntu so we’re going to take a look at using IPVanish in Kali — including an interesting and unanticipated snag (and, of course, how to fix it).

Let’s grab the OpenVPN configuration:
wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ca.ipvanish.com.crt; wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ipvanish-US-New-York-nyc-a01.ovpn

We will need the OpenVPN package for Gnome:
apt install network-manager-openvpn-gnome

Click on the tray in the upper right corner, then the wrench/screwdriver icon:

Select the ‘Network’ folder icon:

We’re choosing ‘Wired’ (even though we’re using wlan0 interface):

We’re setting up a VPN, of course:

Import from file:

Choose the configuration file that we downloaded previously:

Enter ‘User name’ and ‘Password’:

We are connected!

Verified at IPVanish’s site: https://www.ipvanish.com/checkIP.php

And this is where I had anticipated the installation instructions would end.

I just wanted to check a few more things. And I would love to tell you that it was simply my thoroughness and unbridled CLI-fu that led to discover that I was still making ipv6 connections outside of the VPN. Seems that it wasn’t noticed by the test at IPVanish because they deal only in ipv4. I was able to prove my ipv6 address and geolocation by using: http://whatismyipaddress.com/

Further, we can establish that the test at IPVanish is not ipv6-compatible with a quick test.

The easy fix here is to disable ipv6 locally. It is plausible that this could cause unintended consequences and, to be thorough, it would be best to handle your VPN at the firewall. Having support for OpenVPN, you’ll be able to get this running with a huge variety of routing/firewall solutions. You can grab any number of tiny computers and build a professional-quality firewall solution with something like pfSense. Maybe we’ll take a look at getting that configured in a future post.

But, for now, let’s shut down ipv6 in a way that doesn’t involve any grandiose hand-waving magic (i.e., unexplained commands which probably should work) and then test to get confidence in our results.

Let’s use sysctl to find our ipv6 kernel bits and turn them off. Then we’ll load our configuration changes. As a safety, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to look in /etc/sysctl.conf to verify that there aren’t any ipv6 configs in there.

We’ll back up our config file then turn off everything ipv6 by listing everything with the words ‘ipv6’ and ‘disable’:
cp /etc/sysctl.conf /etc/$(date +%Y-%m-%d.%H-%M-%S).sysctl.conf.bak && \
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable | sed 's/0/1/g' >> /etc/sysctl.conf && \
sysctl -p

To explain what we’re doing:
List all kernel flags; show uonly those containing the string ‘ipv6’; of those that remain, show only those that contain the string ‘disable’:
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable
Replace the 0 values with 1, to turn ON the disabling, by piping output to:
sed 's/0/1/g'
That all gets stuck on the end of ‘sysctl.conf’ by redirecting stdout to append to the end of that file:
>> /etc/sysctl.conf
Then we reload with:
sysctl -p

Then as a final sanity-check we’ll make sure we can’t find any ipv6 packets sneaking about:
tcpdump -t -n -i wlan0 -s 256 -vv ip6

At this point, assuming our tcpdump doesn’t show any traffic, we should be ipv6-free with all of our ipv4 traffic shipped-off nicely through IPVanish!


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Permalink: 20170307.privacy.vpn.ipvanish

Sat, 18 Feb 2017

The making of a Docker: Part II - Wickr: with bonus analysis

Recently, I read a rather excited attention-catching piece about how Wickr is the super-secure version of Slack. Attention caught in part because I feel like Wickr has been around for a while. I’d not seen anyone raving about its security in places where I normally interact with those who are highly informed about such subjects.

Good is that it seems the folk at Wickr did a fine job of making sure valuable data aren’t left behind.
The bad: closed-source, not subject to independent review; crazy marketin’-fancy-talk without a thorough description of how it does what is claimed.
Any time I’m looking at a product or service that boasts security, I sort of expect to see a threat model.

[ Update: At the time I was working on this project, the folk at Wickr were, evidently, opening their source. That’s spectacular news! Check it out on Github. ]

This began as an exercise to provide another piece of security-ish software in a Docker container. Anyone who has used a live distro (e.g., Kali, TAILS) with any regularity knows the ritual of installing favorite tools at each boot, data stores on removable media.

For me, there is tremendous appeal in reducing that to something like:
git clone https://georgeglarson/wickr
cd docker-wickr
./install.sh
wickr

Let’s dig in!

Having created a number of Docker containers my workflow is to queue up the base OS and go through the steps needed to get the software running while keeping careful notes. In this case, I had originally tried to install Wickr on a current copy of Kali. It was already known that Wickr, based off of Ubuntu 14.04, needed an older unicode library. So we begin with Ubuntu 14.04.

Grab a copy of Wickr and see what’s required:
dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

new debian package, version 2.0.
size 78890218 bytes: control archive=4813 bytes.
558 bytes, 14 lines control
558 bytes, 14 lines control64
10808 bytes, 140 lines md5sums
Package: wickr-me
Architecture: amd64
Section: net
Priority: optional
Version: 2.6.0-4
Replaces: wickr
Conflicts: wickr
Depends: libsqlcipher0, libuuid1, libicu52, libavutil52|libavutil54, libc6, libssl1.0.0, libx264-142, libglib2.0-0, libpulse0, libxrender1, libgl1-mesa-glx
Recommends: libnotify-bin, gstreamer-plugins0.10-good, gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad, gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly
Maintainer: Wickr Inc.
Installed-Size: 200000
Description: Secure Internet Chat and Media Exchange agent
Wickr is a secure communications client

Okay. The CLI should do most of the work for us, giving a formatted list of dependencies.
dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb | grep -E "^ Depends: | Recommends: " | sed -e "s/ Depends: //" -e "s/ Recommends: //" -e "s/,//g" -e "s/ / \\\ \n/g"

libsqlcipher0 \
libuuid1 \
libicu52 \
libavutil54 \
libc6 \
libssl1.0.0 \
libx264-142 \
libglib2.0-0 \
libpulse0 \
libxrender1 \
libgl1-mesa-glx
libnotify-bin \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-good \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly \

Attempting to get those with apt-get reports that it cannot find the gstreamer bits.

Let’s find:
apt-cache search gstreamer | grep -i plugin | grep -E "good|bad|ugly"

gstreamer0.10-plugins-good - GStreamer plugins from the "good" set
...
gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad - GStreamer plugins from the "bad" set
...
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly - GStreamer plugins from the "ugly" set

So, there’s the format we need to get the gstreamer dependencies. We know that we’ll also want SSH and wget. That should be enough for our Dockerfile.

We’ll pull down Wickr:
wget https://dls.wickr.com/Downloads/wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

Then install:
dpkg -i wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

Okay! We are, in theory, ready to run Wickr. We’re about to see we aren’t yet there — but these sorts of problems are pretty commonplace.
wickr-me

wickr-me: error while loading shared libraries: libxslt.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Huh! We need libxslt. Let’s fix that: apt-get install libxslt1-dev

Now we can run it.
wickr-me

This application failed to start because it could not find or load the Qt platform plugin "xcb".

Available platform plugins are: eglfs, linuxfb, minimal, minimalegl, offscreen, xcb.

Reinstalling the application may fix this problem.
Aborted (core dumped)

One more: apt-get install xcb

Okay. That really was the last one. Now we have a complete list of dependencies for our Dockerfile:
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-good \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly \
libsqlcipher0 \
libuuid1 \
libicu52 \
libavutil52 \
libc6 \
libssl1.0.0 \
libx264-142 \
libglib2.0-0 \
libpulse0 \
libxrender1 \
libxslt1-dev \
libgl1-mesa-glx \
libnotify-bin \
ssh \
wget \
xcb \
&& apt-get clean \

We now have Wickr in a Docker container and, because we are the curious sort, need to peek into what’s happening.

A natural first step is to set Wireshark atop Wickr. At a glance, seems to be communicating with a single IP address (204.232.166.114) via HTTPS.

Unsurprsingly, the client communicates to the server whenever a message is sent. Further it appears to poll the same address periodically asking for new messages. We see that the address resolves to Rackspace in San Antonio, TX.

We can easily establish the link between this IP address, Rackspace and the application.

Well, that’s enough. Right?

Good!

Wait.

What?

We’re still a little curious.

Aren’t we?

I mean, what’s the big question here? What happens if there’s a man in the middle? Persons so eagerly connect to any free WIFI, it is clearly a plausible scenario. Well… One way to find out!

Here’s what we learned. Server-side, the application is written in PHP. The IP address is resolved by the URI ‘secex.info’.

When we send, it calls ‘postMessage.php’:

When we receive, ‘downloadMessage.php’:

And it calls ‘newMessageCheck.php’ to, y’know, check for new messages.

Other analyses have forensically examined artefacts left behind; there are published descriptions of the encryption methods used for the local database connection. We didn’t go into more aggressive efforts such as disassembly because we are too lazy for that jazz!

My opinion, we didn’t learn anything wildly unexpected. Overall, Wickr seems an okay solution for convenient encrypted messaging. That’s always the trade: convenience vs. security. Least we ended with a Docker container for the software!

Github | Docker


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Permalink: 20170218.making.a.docker.wickr

Wed, 15 May 2013

Git: an untracked mess?

There may be times when you find your Git repository burdened with scads of untracked files left aside while twiddling, testing bug patches, or what-have-youse.

For the especially scatter-brained among us, these things can go unchecked until a day when the useful bits of a git status scroll off the screen due to utterly unimportant stuff. Well, hopefully unimportant.

But we’d better not just cleave away everything that we haven’t checked in. You wonder:
What if there’s something important in one of those files?

You are so right!

Let’s fix this!

Firstly, we want a solution that’s reproducible. Only want to invent this wheel once, right?

Let’s begin with the play-by-play:

Git, we want a list of what isn’t tracked: git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z

We’ll back these files up in our home directory (~), using CPIO but we don’t want a poorly-named directory or finding anything will become its own obstacle. So we’ll take use the current date (date +%Y-%m-%d), directory (pwd) and branch we’re using (git branch) and we’ll twist all of it into a meaningful, but appropriate, directory name using sed. git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/

Then Tell Git to remove the untracked files and directories: git clean -d -f

Ahhhh… Much better. Is there anything left out? Perhaps. What if we decide that moving these files away was a mistake? The kind of mistake that breaks something. If we realize right away, it’s easily-enough undone. But what if we break something and don’t notice for a week or two? It’d probably be best if we had an automated script to put things back the way they were. Let’s do that.

Simple enough. We’ll just take the opposite commands and echo them into a script to be used in case of emergency.

Create the restore script (restore.sh), to excuse faulty memory: echo "(cd ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Make the restore script executable: chmod u+x ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Lastly, the magic, compressed into one line that will stop if any command does not report success: a='untracked-git-backup-'`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`; git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/$a/ && git clean -d -f && echo "(cd ~/$a/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/$a/restore.sh && chmod +x ~/$a/restore.sh; unset a


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Permalink: 20130515.git.untracked.mess

Mon, 13 May 2013

Zsh and hash

Documentation for this one seems a bit hard to come by but it is one of the things I love about Zsh.

I’ve seen many .bashrc files that have things like:
alias www='cd /var/www'
alias music='cd /home/j0rg3/music'

And that’s a perfectly sensible way to make life a little easier, especially if the paths are very long.

In Zsh, however, we can use the hash command and the shortcut we get from it works fully as the path. Other words, using the version above, if we want to edit ‘index.html’ in the ‘www’ directory, we would have to issue the shortcut to get there and then edit the file, in two steps:
> www
> vim index.html

The improved version in .zshrc would look like:
hash www=/var/www
hash -d www=/var/www

Then, at any time, you can use tilde (~) and your shortcut in place of path.
> vim ~www/index.html

Even better, it integrates with Zsh’s robust completions so you can, for example, type cd ~www/ and then use the tab key to cycle through subdirectories and files.

On this system, I’m using something like this:
(.zshrc)
hash posts=/home/j0rg3/weblog/posts
hash -d posts=/home/j0rg3/weblog/posts

Then we can make a function to create a new post, to paste into .zshrc. Since we want to be able to edit and save, without partial posts becoming visible, while we are working, we’ll use an extra .tmp extension at the end:
post() { vim ~posts/`date +%Y-%m`/`date +%Y%m%d`.$1.txt.tmp }

[ In-line date command unfamiliar? See earlier explanation ]

But, surely there is going to be a point when we need to save a post and finish it later. For now, let’s assume that only a single post will be in limbo at any time. We definitely don’t want to have to remember the exact name of the post — and we don’t want to have hunt it down every time.

We can make those things easier like this:
alias resume="vim `find ~posts/ -name '*.txt.tmp'`"

Now, we can just enter resume and the system will go find the post we were working on and open it up for us to finish. The file will need the extension renamed from .txt.tmp to only .txt to publish the post but, for the sake of brevity, we’ll think about that (and having multiple posts in editing) on another day.


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Permalink: 20130513.zsh.and.hash

Wed, 08 May 2013

Deleting backup files left behind by Vim

It’s generally a great idea to have Vim keep backups. Once in awhile, they can really save your bacon.

The other side of that coin, though, is that they can get left behind here and there, eventually causing aggravation.

Here’s a snippet to find and eliminate those files from the current directory down:

find ./ -name '*~' -exec rm '{}' \; -print -or -name ".*~" -exec rm {} \; -print
This uses find from the current directory down (./) to execute an rm statement on all files with an extension ending in tilde (~)
Alternatively, you could just store your backups elsewhere. In Vim, use :help backupdir for more information.


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Permalink: 20130508.delete.vim.backups