c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Tue, 10 Jan 2017

[-] Auxiliary failed: Msf::OptionValidateError The following options failed to validate: RHOSTS.

Mucking about with a fresh copy of Kali brings to attention that it’s packaged with an Armitage that doesn’t correctly work.

I know what you’re thinking… Good. Type the commands into Msfconsole like a real man, y’uh lazy good-fer-naught! And, in practice, that was my immediate solution. But I can’t resist a good tinker when things are misbehaving.

I was anticipating that the problem would be thoroughly solved when I ixquicked it. That was partially correct. Surprised, however, when apt-get update && apt-get upgrade didn’t fix the issue. More surprised at the age of the issue. Most surprised that I could see lots of evidence that users have been plagued by this issue — but no clear work arounds were quickly found.

Guess what we’re doing today?

Okay. The issue is quite minor but just enough to be heartbreaking to the fledgling pentester trying to get a VM off the ground.

In brief, the owner of Armitage’s Github explains:

The MSF Scans feature in Armitage parses output from Metasploit’s portscan/tcp module and uses these results to build a list of targets it should run various Metasploit auxiliary modules against. A recent-ish update to the Metasploit Framework changed the format of the portscan/tcp module output. A patch to fix this issue just needs to account for the new format of the portscan/tcp module.

That is, a colon makes it into the input for the Msfconsole command to define RHOSTS. I.e.: set RHOSTS 172.16.223.150: - 172.16.223.150

An other kind coder tweaked the regex and submitted the patch and pull request, which was successfully incorporated into the project.

Sadly, things have stalled out there. So if this problem is crippling your rig, let’s fix it!

We just want a fresh copy of the project.
root@kali:~/armitage# git clone https://github.com/rsmudge/armitage

Cloning into ‘armitage’…
remote: Counting objects: 7564, done.
remote: Total 7564 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 7564
Receiving objects: 100% (7564/7564), 47.12 MiB | 2.91 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (5608/5608), done.

Kali is Debian-based and we’re going to need Apache Ant:
root@kali:~/armitage# apt-get install ant

Then, we’ll build our new fella:
root@kali:~/armitage# cd armitage
root@kali:~/armitage# ./package.sh

Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

clean:

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 0 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:
[mkdir] Created dir: /root/test/armitage/bin

compile:
[javac] Compiling 111 source files to /root/test/armitage/bin
[javac] depend attribute is not supported by the modern compiler
[javac] Note: /root/test/armitage/src/ui/MultiFrame.java uses or overrides a deprecated API.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:deprecation for details.
[javac] Note: Some input files use unchecked or unsafe operations.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:unchecked for details.

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 2 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:

compile:

jar:
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/sleep.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/jgraphx.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/msgpack-0.6.12-devel.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/postgresql-9.1-901.jdbc4.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/javassist-3.15.0-GA.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[copy] Copying 4 files to /root/test/armitage/bin/scripts-cortana
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/armitage.jar
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/cortana.jar

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 1 second
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
adding: readme.txt (deflated 55%)
adding: armitage.exe (deflated 49%)
adding: cortana.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: armitage.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: whatsnew.txt (deflated 65%)
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
Archive: ../../armitage.zip
inflating: readme.txt
inflating: armitage.exe
inflating: cortana.jar
inflating: armitage.jar
inflating: whatsnew.txt

And here, best I can guess from messages read, is where a lot of people are running into trouble. We have successfully produced our new working copy of armitage. However, it is in our own local directory and will not be run if we just enter the command: armitage

Let’s review how to figure out what we want to do about that.

First, we want to verify what happens when we run the command armitage.
root@kali:~/armitage# which armitage

/usr/bin/armitage

Good! Let’s check and see what that does!
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/bin/armitage

#!/bin/sh

cd /usr/share/armitage/
exec ./armitage “$@”

Almost there! It’s running /usr/share/armitage/armitage with whatever variables we’ve passed in. We’ll check that out.
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/share/armitage/armitage

#!/bin/sh
java -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar armitage.jar $@

We have enough information to assemble a solution.

I trust that the people behind Kali and Armitage will get this corrected so I don’t want to suggest a solution that would replace the armitage command and prevent an updated version from running later. So, let’s just make a temporary replacement?

root@kali:~/armitage# echo -e '#!/bin/sh\njava -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar ~/armitage/armitage.jar $@' > /usr/bin/tmparmitage

Hereafter, we can use the command ‘tmparmitage’ (either CLI or ALT-F2) to run our fresh version until things catch up.

And, of course, to save you the time, weary hacker:

Download here:
    armitage_quick_fix.sh


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Permalink: 20170110.armitage.not.working.in.kali

Tue, 20 Dec 2016

Kicking the Crypto-tires

Some time ago I had begun work on my own Pastebin-type project with a few goals. Basically, I wanted to eat all the cakes — and have them too.

  • Both an online user interface and efficient CLI usage
  • Messages encrypted immediately such that database access does not provide one with the contents of the messages
  • Messages capable of self-destructing
  • Database schema that would allow rebuilding the user/message relationship, provided the same password but would not store those relationships
  • Also, JavaScript encryption to appeal to users who don’t know much about cryptography but would like to try
  • The project, honestly, was going swimmingly when derailed by the goings-on of life.

    One of the interesting components of the project was, of course, choosing crypto implementations. There are know shortcomings to handling it in JS but that’s still the most convenient for some users. Outside of the browser, server-side, you had all the same questions about which solution was best. Which protocol(s) should be available?

    Well, I’ve just learned about a project which I would have loved to have available back then. Project Wycheproof can help you test your crypto solutions against known problems and attacks. Featuring 80 tests probing at 40 known bugs, here’s a snip from the introduction:

    Project Wycheproof has tests for the most popular crypto algorithms, including

  • AES-EAXAES-GCM
  • AES-GCM
  • DH
  • DHIES
  • DSA
  • ECDH
  • ECDSA
  • ECIES
  • RSA
  • The tests detect whether a library is vulnerable to many attacks, including

  • Invalid curve attacks
  • Biased nonces in digital signature schemes
  • Of course, all Bleichenbacher’s attacks
  • And many more — we have over 80 test cases
  • Interesting stuff with exciting potential!


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    Permalink: 20161220.kicking.the.crypto.tires

    Thu, 13 Jun 2013

    Blogitechture continued… Simplify with Vim

    Last we were discussing the structure and design of your own CLI-centric blog platform, we had some crude methods of starting and resuming posts before publishing.

    Today, let’s explore a little more into setting up a bloging-friendly environment because we need to either make the experience of blogging easy or we’ll grow tired of the hassle and lose interest.

    We can reasonably anticipate that we won’t want to beleaguered with repetitious typing of HTML bits. If we’re going to apply paragraph tags, hyperlinks, codeblocks, etc. with any frequency, that task is best to be simplified. Using Vim as our preferred editor, we will use Tim Pope’s brilliant plug-ins ‘surround’ and ‘repeat’, combined with abbreviations to take away the tedium.

    The plug-ins just need dropped into your Vim plugin directory (~/.vim/plugin/). The directory may not exist if you don’t have any plug-ins yet. That’s no problem, though. Let’s grab the plugins:

    cd ~/.vim/
    wget "http://www.vim.org/scripts/download_script.php?src_id=19287" -O surround.zip
    wget "http://www.vim.org/scripts/download_script.php?src_id=19285" -O repeat.zip

    Expand the archives into the appropriate directories:

    unzip surround.zip
    unzip repeat.zip

    Ta-da! Your Vim is now configured to quickly wrap (surround) in any variety of markup. When working on a blog, you might use <p> tags a lot by putting your cursor amid the paragraph and typing yss<p>. The plug-in will wrap it with opening and closing paragraph tags. Move to your next paragraph and then press . to repeat.

    That out of the way, let’s take advantage of Vim’s abbreviations for some customization. In our .vimrc file, we can define a few characters that Vim will expand according to their definition. For example, you might use:
    ab <gclb> <code class="prettyprint lang-bsh linenums:1">
    Then, any time you type <gclb> and bress <enter>, you’ll get:
    <code class="prettyprint lang-bsh linenums:1">

    The next time that we take a look at blogitecture, we will focus on making the posts convenient to manage from our CLI.


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    Permalink: 20130613.blogitechture.continued

    Wed, 08 May 2013

    Deleting backup files left behind by Vim

    It’s generally a great idea to have Vim keep backups. Once in awhile, they can really save your bacon.

    The other side of that coin, though, is that they can get left behind here and there, eventually causing aggravation.

    Here’s a snippet to find and eliminate those files from the current directory down:

    find ./ -name '*~' -exec rm '{}' \; -print -or -name ".*~" -exec rm {} \; -print
    This uses find from the current directory down (./) to execute an rm statement on all files with an extension ending in tilde (~)
    Alternatively, you could just store your backups elsewhere. In Vim, use :help backupdir for more information.


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    Permalink: 20130508.delete.vim.backups

    Tue, 07 May 2013

    Welcome, traveler.

    Thanks for visiting my little spot on the web. This is a Blosxom ‘blog which, for those who don’t know, is a CGI written in Perl using the file-system (rather than a database).

    To the CLI-addicted, this is an awesome little product. Accepting, of course, that you’re going to get under the hood if you’re going to make it the product you want. After some modules and hacking, I’m pleased with the result.

    My posts are just text files, meaning I start a new one like: vim ~posts/`date +%Y%m%d`.brief.subject.txt

    Note: the back-ticks (`) tell the system that you want to execute the command between ticks, and dynamically insert its output into the command. In this case, the command date with these parameters:
    1. (+) we’re going to specify a format
    2. (%Y) four-digit year
    3. (%m) two-digit month
    4. (%d) two-digit day
    That means the command above will use Vim to edit a text file named ‘20130507.brief.subject.txt’ in the directory I have assigned to the hash of ‘posts’. (using hash this way is a function of Zsh that I’ll cover in another post)

    In my CLI-oriented ‘blog, I can sprinkle in my own HTML or use common notation like wrapping a word in underscores to have it underlined, forward-slashes for italics and asterisks for bold.

    Toss in a line that identifies tags and, since Perl is the beast of Regex, we pick up the tags and make them links, meta-tags, etc.

    Things here are likely to change a lot at first, while I twiddle with CSS and hack away at making a Blosxom that perfectly fits my tastes — so don’t be too alarmed if you visit and things look a tad wonky. It just means that I’m tinkering.

    Once the saw-horses have been tucked away, I’m going to take the various notes I’ve made during my years in IT and write them out, in a very simple breakdown, aimed at sharing these with people who know little about how to negotiate the command line. The assumption here is that you have an interest in *nix/BSD. If you’ve that and the CLI is not a major part of your computing experience, it probably will be at some point. If you’re working on systems remotely, graphical interfaces often just impede you.

    Once you’ve started working on remote machines, the rest is inevitable. You can either remember how to do everything two ways, through a graphical interface and CLI — or just start using the CLI for everything.

    So let’s take a little journey through the kinds of things that make me love the CLI.


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    Permalink: 20130507.greetings