c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Tue, 07 Mar 2017

Privacy Part II: VPN/IPVanish - Install IPVanish on Kali Linux

Okay, so you’re running Whonix, Tails or, at least, TorBrowser.

What’s next? You may wish to consider using a VPN. In simple terms, it’s somewhat similar to what Tor offers. That is: you connect to the VPN and your connection passes through them such that the site that you are visiting will see the VPN’s IP address rather than yours. Of course, that means that you can chain them.

That is: (You)->VPN->Tor->Exit node->Web site

The reason that you might feel compelled to take this step is that a party which is able to see your traffic into and out of Tor could still identify you. The thinking is that the parties who wish to interfere with your privacy could be compelled to run Tor bridges, relays and exit nodes. If traffic from your IP address could be matched to requests coming from the Tor exit node then you could, effectively, be identified.

Some people hold that using a VPN to access Tor does not improve your anonymousness. I am not among them. In particular, you will find that IPVanish offers VPN service for under $7 per month and is popular among users of the Tor network. Which means that in addition to the fact that IPVanish is not logging your traffic, there’s an excellent chance that other users are going from IPVanish into Tor, helping to reduce the uniqueness of your traffic.

By the way, I’d suggest poking around the web a little bit. While their prices are already great you can find some even deeper discounts: https://signup.ipvanish.com/?aff=vpnfan-promo

IPVanish’s site offers instructions for installing the VPN in Ubuntu so we’re going to take a look at using IPVanish in Kali — including an interesting and unanticipated snag (and, of course, how to fix it).

Let’s grab the OpenVPN configuration:
wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ca.ipvanish.com.crt; wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ipvanish-US-New-York-nyc-a01.ovpn

We will need the OpenVPN package for Gnome:
apt install network-manager-openvpn-gnome

Click on the tray in the upper right corner, then the wrench/screwdriver icon:

Select the ‘Network’ folder icon:

We’re choosing ‘Wired’ (even though we’re using wlan0 interface):

We’re setting up a VPN, of course:

Import from file:

Choose the configuration file that we downloaded previously:

Enter ‘User name’ and ‘Password’:

We are connected!

Verified at IPVanish’s site: https://www.ipvanish.com/checkIP.php

And this is where I had anticipated the installation instructions would end.

I just wanted to check a few more things. And I would love to tell you that it was simply my thoroughness and unbridled CLI-fu that led to discover that I was still making ipv6 connections outside of the VPN. Seems that it wasn’t noticed by the test at IPVanish because they deal only in ipv4. I was able to prove my ipv6 address and geolocation by using: http://whatismyipaddress.com/

Further, we can establish that the test at IPVanish is not ipv6-compatible with a quick test.

The easy fix here is to disable ipv6 locally. It is plausible that this could cause unintended consequences and, to be thorough, it would be best to handle your VPN at the firewall. Having support for OpenVPN, you’ll be able to get this running with a huge variety of routing/firewall solutions. You can grab any number of tiny computers and build a professional-quality firewall solution with something like pfSense. Maybe we’ll take a look at getting that configured in a future post.

But, for now, let’s shut down ipv6 in a way that doesn’t involve any grandiose hand-waving magic (i.e., unexplained commands which probably should work) and then test to get confidence in our results.

Let’s use sysctl to find our ipv6 kernel bits and turn them off. Then we’ll load our configuration changes. As a safety, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to look in /etc/sysctl.conf to verify that there aren’t any ipv6 configs in there.

We’ll back up our config file then turn off everything ipv6 by listing everything with the words ‘ipv6’ and ‘disable’:
cp /etc/sysctl.conf /etc/$(date +%Y-%m-%d.%H-%M-%S).sysctl.conf.bak && \
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable | sed 's/0/1/g' >> /etc/sysctl.conf && \
sysctl -p

To explain what we’re doing:
List all kernel flags; show uonly those containing the string ‘ipv6’; of those that remain, show only those that contain the string ‘disable’:
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable
Replace the 0 values with 1, to turn ON the disabling, by piping output to:
sed 's/0/1/g'
That all gets stuck on the end of ‘sysctl.conf’ by redirecting stdout to append to the end of that file:
>> /etc/sysctl.conf
Then we reload with:
sysctl -p

Then as a final sanity-check we’ll make sure we can’t find any ipv6 packets sneaking about:
tcpdump -t -n -i wlan0 -s 256 -vv ip6

At this point, assuming our tcpdump doesn’t show any traffic, we should be ipv6-free with all of our ipv4 traffic shipped-off nicely through IPVanish!


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Permalink: 20170307.privacy.vpn.ipvanish

Sat, 25 Jan 2014

Network-aware Synergy client

My primary machines are *nix or BSD variants, though I certainly have some Windows-based rigs also. Today we’re going to share some love with Windows 7 and PowerShell.

One of my favorite utilities is Synergy. If you’re not already familiar it allows to you seamlessly move from the desktop of one computer to another with the same keyboard and mouse. It even supports the clipboard so you might copy text from a GNU/Linux box and paste it in a Windows’ window. Possibly, they have finished adding drag and drop to the newer versions. I am not sure because I run a relatively old version that is supported by all of the machines that I use regularly.

What’s the problem, then? The problem was that I was starting my Synergy client by hand. Even more disturbing, I was manually typing the IP address at work and at home, twice or more per weekday. This behavior became automated by my brain and continued for months unnoticed. But this is no kind of life for a geek such as myself, what with all this superfluous clicking and tapping!

Today, we set things right!

In my situation, the networks that I use happen to assign IP addresses from different subnets. If you’ve not the convenience of that situation then you might need to add something to the script. Parsing an ipconfig/ifconfig command, you could possibly use something like the Default Gateway or the Connection-specific DNS Suffix. Alternatively, you could check for the presence of some network share, a file on server or anything that would allow you to uniquely identify the surroundings.

As I imagined it, I wanted the script to accomplish the following things

  • see if Synergy is running (possibly from the last location), if so ask if we need to kill it and restart so we can identify a new server
  • attempt to locate where we are and connect to the correct Synergy server
  • if the location is not identified, ask whether to start the Synergy client

This is how I accomplished that task:

# [void] simply supresses the noise made loading 'System.Reflection.Assembly'
[void] [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.Windows.Forms")

# Define Synergy server IP addresses
$synergyServerWork = "192.168.111.11"
$synergyServerHome = "192.168.222.22"

# Define partial IP addresses that will indicate which server to use
$synergyWorkSubnets = "192.168.111", "192.168.115"
$synergyHomeSubnets = "192.168.222", "192.168.225"

# Path to Synergy Client (synergyc)
$synergyClientProgram = "C:\Program Files\Synergy\synergyc.exe"

# Path to Syngery launcher, for when we cannot identify the network
$synergyLauncherProgram = "C:\Program Files\Synergy\launcher.exe"

# Remove path and file extension to give us the process name
$processName = $synergyClientProgram.Substring( ($synergyClientProgram.lastindexof("\") + 1), ($synergyClientProgram.length - ($synergyClientProgram.lastindexof("\") + 5) ))

# Grab current IP address
$currentIPaddress = ((ipconfig | findstr [0-9].\.)[0]).Split()[-1]

# Find the subnet of current IP address
$location = $currentIPaddress.Substring(0,$currentIPaddress.lastindexof("."))


function BalloonTip ($message)
{
# Pop-up message from System Tray
$objNotifyIcon = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.NotifyIcon
$objNotifyIcon.Icon = [System.Drawing.Icon]::ExtractAssociatedIcon($synergyClientProgram)
$objNotifyIcon.BalloonTipText = $message
$objNotifyIcon.Visible = $True
$objNotifyIcon.ShowBalloonTip(15000)
}


#main

# If Synergy client is already running, do we need to restart it?
$running = Get-Process $processName -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
if ($running) {
$answer = [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show("Synergy is running.`nClose and start again?", "OHNOES", 4)
if ($answer -eq "YES") {
Stop-Process -name $processName
}
Else {
exit
}
}

# Do we recognize the current network?
if ($synergyWorkSubnets -contains $location) {
BalloonTip "IP: $($currentIPaddress)`nServer: $($synergyServerWork)`nConnecting to Synergy server at work."
& $synergyClientProgram $synergyServerWork
exit
}
ElseIf ($synergyHomeSubnets -contains $location) {
BalloonTip "IP: $($currentIPaddress)`nServer: $($synergyServerHome)`nConnecting to Synergy server at home."
& $synergyClientProgram $synergyServerHome
exit
}
Else {
$answer = [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show("Network not recognized by IP address: {0}`n`nLaunch Synergy?" -f $unrecognized, "OHNOES", 4)
if ($answer -eq "YES") {
& $synergyLauncherProgram
}
}

Then I saved the script in "C:\Program Files\SynergyStart\", created a shortcut and used the Change Icon button to make the same as Synergy’s and made the Target:
C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe -WindowStyle Hidden & 'C:\Program Files\SynergyStart\synergy.ps1'

Lastly, I copied the shortcut into the directory of things that run when the system starts up:
%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

Now, Synergy connects to the needed server at home and work. If it can’t figure out where it is, it asks if it should run it at all.

As they say, a millisecond saved is a millisecond earned.

This post was very nearly published without a Linux equivalent. Nearly.

Same trick for bash/zsh: #!/bin/zsh

# Define Synergy server IP addresses
synergyServerWork="192.168.111.11"
synergyServerHome="192.168.222.22"

# Define partial IP addresses that will indicate which server to use
synergyWorkSubnets=("192.168.111" "192.168.115")
synergyHomeSubnets=("192.168.222" "192.168.225")

# Path to Synergy Client (synergyc)
synergyClientProgram="/usr/bin/synergyc"

# Path to QuickSyngery, for when we cannot identify the network
synergyLauncherProgram="/usr/bin/quicksynergy"

# Remove path and file extension to give us the process name
processName=`basename $synergyClientProgram`

# Grab current IP address, assumes '192' is in use. (e.g., 192.168.1.1)
currentIPaddress=`ip addr show | grep 192 | awk "{print $2}" | sed 's/inet //;s/\/.*//;s/ //g'`

# Find the subnet of current IP address
location=`echo $currentIPaddress | cut -d '.' -f 1,2,3`

for i in "${synergyWorkSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
break
fi
done

#main

# If Synergy client is already running, do we need to restart it?
running=`ps ax | grep -v grep | grep $processName`
if [ $running ]
then
if `zenity --question --ok-label="Yes" --cancel-label="No" --text="Synergy is running.\nClose and start again?"`
then
pkill $processName
else
exit
fi
fi

# Do we recognize the current network?
for i in "${synergyWorkSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
notify-send "IP:$currentIPaddress Server:$synergyServerWork [WORK]"
$synergyClientProgram $synergyServerWork
exit
fi
done

for i in "${synergyHomeSubnets[@]}"
do
if [ "${i}" = "${location}" ]
then
notify-send "IP:$currentIPaddress Server:$synergyServerWork [HOME]"
$synergyClientProgram $synergyServerHome
exit
fi
done

if `zenity --question --ok-label="Yes" --cancel-label="No" --text="Network not recognized by IP address: $currentIPaddress\nLaunch Synergy?"`
then
$synergyLauncherProgram
fi

To get it to run automatically, you might choose to call the script from /etc/init.d/rc.local.

Download here:
  PowerShell:
    synergy.ps1
  GNU/Linux:
    synergy.sh


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Permalink: 20140125.network_aware_synergy_client

Thu, 30 May 2013

Making ixquick your default search engine

In this writer’s opinion, it is vitally important that we take reasonable measures now to help insure anonymity, lest we create a situation where privacy no longer exists, and the simple want of, becomes suspicious.

Here’s how to configure your browser to automatically use a search engine that respects your privacy.

Chrome:

  1. Click Settings.
  2. Click “Set pages” in the “On startup” section.
  3. Enter https://ixquick.com/eng/ in the “Add a new page” text field.
  4. Click OK.
  5. Click “Manage search engines…”
  6. At the bottom of the “Search Engines” dialog, click in the “Add a new search engine” field.
  7. Enter
    ixquick
    ixquick.com
    https://ixquick.com/do/search?lui=english&language=english&cat=web&query=%s
  8. Click “Make Default”.
  9. Click “Done”.

Firefox:

  1. Click the Tools Menu.
  2. Click Options.
  3. Click the General tab.
  4. In “When Firefox Starts” dropdown, select “Show my home page”.
  5. Enter https://ixquick.com/eng/ in the “Home Page” text field.
  6. Click one of the English options here.
  7. Check box for “Start using it right away.”
  8. Click “Add”.

Opera:

  1. Click “Manage Search Engines
  2. Click “Add”
  3. Enter
    Name: ixquick
    Keyword: x
    Address: https://ixquick.com/do/search?lui=english&language=english&cat=web&query=%s
  4. Check “Use as default search engine”
  5. Click “OK”

Internet Explorer:

      _     ___  _ __        ___   _ _____ ___ 
     | |   / _ \| |\ \      / / | | |_   _|__ \
     | |  | | | | | \ \ /\ / /| | | | | |   / /
     | |__| |_| | |__\ V  V / | |_| | | |  |_| 
     |_____\___/|_____\_/\_/   \___/  |_|  (_) 
    
    
    (This is not a good strategy for privacy.)

Congratulations!

\o/

You are now one step closer to not having every motion on the Internet recorded.

This is a relatively small measure, though. You can improve your resistance to prying eyes (e.g., browser fingerprinting) by using the Torbrowser Bundle, or even better, Tails, and routing your web usage through Tor, i2p, or FreeNet.

If you would like more on subjects like anonymyzing, privacy and security then drop me a line via email or Bitmessage me: BM-2D9tDkYEJSTnEkGDKf7xYA5rUj2ihETxVR


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Permalink: 20130530.hey.you.get.offa.my.data