c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Sat, 18 Feb 2017

The making of a Docker: Part II - Wickr: with bonus analysis

Recently, I read a rather excited attention-catching piece about how Wickr is the super-secure version of Slack. Attention caught in part because I feel like Wickr has been around for a while. I’d not seen anyone raving about its security in places where I normally interact with those who are highly informed about such subjects.

Good is that it seems the folk at Wickr did a fine job of making sure valuable data aren’t left behind.
The bad: closed-source, not subject to independent review; crazy marketin’-fancy-talk without a thorough description of how it does what is claimed.
Any time I’m looking at a product or service that boasts security, I sort of expect to see a threat model.

[ Update: At the time I was working on this project, the folk at Wickr were, evidently, opening their source. That’s spectacular news! Check it out on Github. ]

This began as an exercise to provide another piece of security-ish software in a Docker container. Anyone who has used a live distro (e.g., Kali, TAILS) with any regularity knows the ritual of installing favorite tools at each boot, data stores on removable media.

For me, there is tremendous appeal in reducing that to something like:
git clone https://georgeglarson/wickr
cd docker-wickr
./install.sh
wickr

Let’s dig in!

Having created a number of Docker containers my workflow is to queue up the base OS and go through the steps needed to get the software running while keeping careful notes. In this case, I had originally tried to install Wickr on a current copy of Kali. It was already known that Wickr, based off of Ubuntu 14.04, needed an older unicode library. So we begin with Ubuntu 14.04.

Grab a copy of Wickr and see what’s required:
dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

new debian package, version 2.0.
size 78890218 bytes: control archive=4813 bytes.
558 bytes, 14 lines control
558 bytes, 14 lines control64
10808 bytes, 140 lines md5sums
Package: wickr-me
Architecture: amd64
Section: net
Priority: optional
Version: 2.6.0-4
Replaces: wickr
Conflicts: wickr
Depends: libsqlcipher0, libuuid1, libicu52, libavutil52|libavutil54, libc6, libssl1.0.0, libx264-142, libglib2.0-0, libpulse0, libxrender1, libgl1-mesa-glx
Recommends: libnotify-bin, gstreamer-plugins0.10-good, gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad, gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly
Maintainer: Wickr Inc.
Installed-Size: 200000
Description: Secure Internet Chat and Media Exchange agent
Wickr is a secure communications client

Okay. The CLI should do most of the work for us, giving a formatted list of dependencies.
dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb | grep -E "^ Depends: | Recommends: " | sed -e "s/ Depends: //" -e "s/ Recommends: //" -e "s/,//g" -e "s/ / \\\ \n/g"

libsqlcipher0 \
libuuid1 \
libicu52 \
libavutil54 \
libc6 \
libssl1.0.0 \
libx264-142 \
libglib2.0-0 \
libpulse0 \
libxrender1 \
libgl1-mesa-glx
libnotify-bin \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-good \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad \
gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly \

Attempting to get those with apt-get reports that it cannot find the gstreamer bits.

Let’s find:
apt-cache search gstreamer | grep -i plugin | grep -E "good|bad|ugly"

gstreamer0.10-plugins-good - GStreamer plugins from the "good" set
...
gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad - GStreamer plugins from the "bad" set
...
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly - GStreamer plugins from the "ugly" set

So, there’s the format we need to get the gstreamer dependencies. We know that we’ll also want SSH and wget. That should be enough for our Dockerfile.

We’ll pull down Wickr:
wget https://dls.wickr.com/Downloads/wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

Then install:
dpkg -i wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

Okay! We are, in theory, ready to run Wickr. We’re about to see we aren’t yet there — but these sorts of problems are pretty commonplace.
wickr-me

wickr-me: error while loading shared libraries: libxslt.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Huh! We need libxslt. Let’s fix that: apt-get install libxslt1-dev

Now we can run it.
wickr-me

This application failed to start because it could not find or load the Qt platform plugin "xcb".

Available platform plugins are: eglfs, linuxfb, minimal, minimalegl, offscreen, xcb.

Reinstalling the application may fix this problem.
Aborted (core dumped)

One more: apt-get install xcb

Okay. That really was the last one. Now we have a complete list of dependencies for our Dockerfile:
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-good \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad \
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly \
libsqlcipher0 \
libuuid1 \
libicu52 \
libavutil52 \
libc6 \
libssl1.0.0 \
libx264-142 \
libglib2.0-0 \
libpulse0 \
libxrender1 \
libxslt1-dev \
libgl1-mesa-glx \
libnotify-bin \
ssh \
wget \
xcb \
&& apt-get clean \

We now have Wickr in a Docker container and, because we are the curious sort, need to peek into what’s happening.

A natural first step is to set Wireshark atop Wickr. At a glance, seems to be communicating with a single IP address (204.232.166.114) via HTTPS.

Unsurprsingly, the client communicates to the server whenever a message is sent. Further it appears to poll the same address periodically asking for new messages. We see that the address resolves to Rackspace in San Antonio, TX.

We can easily establish the link between this IP address, Rackspace and the application.

Well, that’s enough. Right?

Good!

Wait.

What?

We’re still a little curious.

Aren’t we?

I mean, what’s the big question here? What happens if there’s a man in the middle? Persons so eagerly connect to any free WIFI, it is clearly a plausible scenario. Well… One way to find out!

Here’s what we learned. Server-side, the application is written in PHP. The IP address is resolved by the URI ‘secex.info’.

When we send, it calls ‘postMessage.php’:

When we receive, ‘downloadMessage.php’:

And it calls ‘newMessageCheck.php’ to, y’know, check for new messages.

Other analyses have forensically examined artefacts left behind; there are published descriptions of the encryption methods used for the local database connection. We didn’t go into more aggressive efforts such as disassembly because we are too lazy for that jazz!

My opinion, we didn’t learn anything wildly unexpected. Overall, Wickr seems an okay solution for convenient encrypted messaging. That’s always the trade: convenience vs. security. Least we ended with a Docker container for the software!

Github | Docker


Tags: , , ,
Permalink: 20170218.making.a.docker.wickr

Tue, 10 Jan 2017

[-] Auxiliary failed: Msf::OptionValidateError The following options failed to validate: RHOSTS.

Mucking about with a fresh copy of Kali brings to attention that it’s packaged with an Armitage that doesn’t correctly work.

I know what you’re thinking… Good. Type the commands into Msfconsole like a real man, y’uh lazy good-fer-naught! And, in practice, that was my immediate solution. But I can’t resist a good tinker when things are misbehaving.

I was anticipating that the problem would be thoroughly solved when I ixquicked it. That was partially correct. Surprised, however, when apt-get update && apt-get upgrade didn’t fix the issue. More surprised at the age of the issue. Most surprised that I could see lots of evidence that users have been plagued by this issue — but no clear work arounds were quickly found.

Guess what we’re doing today?

Okay. The issue is quite minor but just enough to be heartbreaking to the fledgling pentester trying to get a VM off the ground.

In brief, the owner of Armitage’s Github explains:

The MSF Scans feature in Armitage parses output from Metasploit’s portscan/tcp module and uses these results to build a list of targets it should run various Metasploit auxiliary modules against. A recent-ish update to the Metasploit Framework changed the format of the portscan/tcp module output. A patch to fix this issue just needs to account for the new format of the portscan/tcp module.

That is, a colon makes it into the input for the Msfconsole command to define RHOSTS. I.e.: set RHOSTS 172.16.223.150: - 172.16.223.150

An other kind coder tweaked the regex and submitted the patch and pull request, which was successfully incorporated into the project.

Sadly, things have stalled out there. So if this problem is crippling your rig, let’s fix it!

We just want a fresh copy of the project.
root@kali:~/armitage# git clone https://github.com/rsmudge/armitage

Cloning into ‘armitage’…
remote: Counting objects: 7564, done.
remote: Total 7564 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 7564
Receiving objects: 100% (7564/7564), 47.12 MiB | 2.91 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (5608/5608), done.

Kali is Debian-based and we’re going to need Apache Ant:
root@kali:~/armitage# apt-get install ant

Then, we’ll build our new fella:
root@kali:~/armitage# cd armitage
root@kali:~/armitage# ./package.sh

Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

clean:

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 0 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:
[mkdir] Created dir: /root/test/armitage/bin

compile:
[javac] Compiling 111 source files to /root/test/armitage/bin
[javac] depend attribute is not supported by the modern compiler
[javac] Note: /root/test/armitage/src/ui/MultiFrame.java uses or overrides a deprecated API.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:deprecation for details.
[javac] Note: Some input files use unchecked or unsafe operations.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:unchecked for details.

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 2 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:

compile:

jar:
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/sleep.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/jgraphx.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/msgpack-0.6.12-devel.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/postgresql-9.1-901.jdbc4.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/javassist-3.15.0-GA.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[copy] Copying 4 files to /root/test/armitage/bin/scripts-cortana
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/armitage.jar
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/cortana.jar

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 1 second
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
adding: readme.txt (deflated 55%)
adding: armitage.exe (deflated 49%)
adding: cortana.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: armitage.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: whatsnew.txt (deflated 65%)
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
Archive: ../../armitage.zip
inflating: readme.txt
inflating: armitage.exe
inflating: cortana.jar
inflating: armitage.jar
inflating: whatsnew.txt

And here, best I can guess from messages read, is where a lot of people are running into trouble. We have successfully produced our new working copy of armitage. However, it is in our own local directory and will not be run if we just enter the command: armitage

Let’s review how to figure out what we want to do about that.

First, we want to verify what happens when we run the command armitage.
root@kali:~/armitage# which armitage

/usr/bin/armitage

Good! Let’s check and see what that does!
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/bin/armitage

#!/bin/sh

cd /usr/share/armitage/
exec ./armitage “$@”

Almost there! It’s running /usr/share/armitage/armitage with whatever variables we’ve passed in. We’ll check that out.
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/share/armitage/armitage

#!/bin/sh
java -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar armitage.jar $@

We have enough information to assemble a solution.

I trust that the people behind Kali and Armitage will get this corrected so I don’t want to suggest a solution that would replace the armitage command and prevent an updated version from running later. So, let’s just make a temporary replacement?

root@kali:~/armitage# echo -e '#!/bin/sh\njava -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar ~/armitage/armitage.jar $@' > /usr/bin/tmparmitage

Hereafter, we can use the command ‘tmparmitage’ (either CLI or ALT-F2) to run our fresh version until things catch up.

And, of course, to save you the time, weary hacker:

Download here:
    armitage_quick_fix.sh


Tags: , , , , , , ,
Permalink: 20170110.armitage.not.working.in.kali

Tue, 20 Dec 2016

Kicking the Crypto-tires

Some time ago I had begun work on my own Pastebin-type project with a few goals. Basically, I wanted to eat all the cakes — and have them too.

  • Both an online user interface and efficient CLI usage
  • Messages encrypted immediately such that database access does not provide one with the contents of the messages
  • Messages capable of self-destructing
  • Database schema that would allow rebuilding the user/message relationship, provided the same password but would not store those relationships
  • Also, JavaScript encryption to appeal to users who don’t know much about cryptography but would like to try
  • The project, honestly, was going swimmingly when derailed by the goings-on of life.

    One of the interesting components of the project was, of course, choosing crypto implementations. There are know shortcomings to handling it in JS but that’s still the most convenient for some users. Outside of the browser, server-side, you had all the same questions about which solution was best. Which protocol(s) should be available?

    Well, I’ve just learned about a project which I would have loved to have available back then. Project Wycheproof can help you test your crypto solutions against known problems and attacks. Featuring 80 tests probing at 40 known bugs, here’s a snip from the introduction:

    Project Wycheproof has tests for the most popular crypto algorithms, including

  • AES-EAXAES-GCM
  • AES-GCM
  • DH
  • DHIES
  • DSA
  • ECDH
  • ECDSA
  • ECIES
  • RSA
  • The tests detect whether a library is vulnerable to many attacks, including

  • Invalid curve attacks
  • Biased nonces in digital signature schemes
  • Of course, all Bleichenbacher’s attacks
  • And many more — we have over 80 test cases
  • Interesting stuff with exciting potential!


    Tags: , ,
    Permalink: 20161220.kicking.the.crypto.tires