c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Fri, 17 Feb 2017

The making of a Docker: Part I - Bitmessage GUI with SSH X forwarding

Lately, I’ve been doing a lot of work from a laptop running Kali. Engaged in pursuit of a new job, I’m brushing up on some old tools and skills, exploring some bits that have changed.

My primary desktop rig is currently running Arch because I love the fine grain control and the aggressive releases. Over the years, I’ve Gentoo’d and Slacked, Crunchbanged, BSD’d, Solarised, et cet. And I’ve a fondness for all of them, especially the security-minded focus of OpenBSD. But, these days we’re usually on Arch or Kali. Initially, I went with Black Arch on the laptop but I felt the things and ways I was fixing things were too specific to my situation to be good material for posts.

Anyway, I wanted to get Bitmessage running, corresponding to another post I have in drafts. On Kali, it wasn’t going well so I put it on the Arch box and just ran it over the network. A reasonable solution if you’re in my house but also the sort of solution that will keep a hacker up at night.

If you’re lucky, there’s someone maintaining a package for the piece of software that you want to run. However, that’s often not the case.

If I correctly recall, to “fix” the problem with Bitmessage on Kali would’ve required the manual installation an older version of libraries that were already present. Those libraries should, in fact, be all ebony and ivory, living together in harmony. However, I just didn’t love the idea of that solution. I wanted to find an approach that would be useful on a broader scale.

Enter containerization/virtualization!

Wanting the lightest solution, I quickly went to Docker and realized something. I have not before built a Docker container for a GUI application. And Bitmessage’s CLI/daemon mode doesn’t provide the fluid UX that I wanted. Well, the easy way to get a GUI out of a Docker container is to forward DISPLAY as an evironment variable (i.e., docker run -e DISPLAY=$DISPLAY). Splendid!

Except that it doesn’t work on current Kali which is using QT4. There’s a when graphical apps are run as root and though it is fixed in QT5, we are using current Kali. And that means we are, by default, uid 0 and QT4.

I saw a bunch of workarounds that seemed to have spotty (at best) rates of success including seting QT’s graphics system to Native and giving Xorg over to root. They, mostly, seemed to be cargo cult solutions.

What made the most sense to my (generally questionable) mind was to use X forwarding. Since I had already been running Bitmessage over X forwarding from my Arch box, I knew it should work just the same.

To be completely truthful, the first pass I took at this was with Vagrant mostly because it’s SO easy. Bring up your Vagrant Box and then:
vagrant ssh -- -X
Viola!

Having proof of concept, I wanted a Docker container. The reason for this is practical. Vagrant, while completely awesome, has substantially more overhead than Docker by virtualizing the kernel. We don’t want a separate kernel running for each application. Therefore Docker is the better choice for this project.

Also, we want this whole thing to be seemless. We want to run the command bitmessage and it should fire up with minimal awkwardness and hopefully no extra steps. That is we do not want to run the Docker container then SSH into it and execute Bitmessage as individual steps. Even though that’s going to be how we begin.

The Bitmessage wiki accurately describes how to install the software so we’ll focus on the SSH setup. Though when we build the Dockerfile we will need to add SSH to the list from the wiki.

We’re going to want the container to start so that the SSH daemon is ready. Until then we can’t SSH (with X forwarding) into the container. Then we’ll want to use SSH to kick off the Bitmessage application, drawing the graphical interface using our host system’s X11.

We’re going to take advantage of Docker’s -v --volume option which allows us to specify a directory on our host system to be mounted inside our container. Using this feature, we’ll generate our SSH keys on the host and make them automatically available inside the container. We’ll tuck the keys inside the directory that Bitmessage uses for storing its configuration and data. That way Bitmessage’s configuration and stored messages can be persistent between runs — and all of your pieces are kept in a single place.

When we generate the container /etc/ssh/sshd_config is configured to allow root login without password only (i.e., using keys). So here’s how we’ll get this done:
mkdir -p ~/.config/PyBitmessage/keys #Ensure that our data directories exist
cd ~/.config/PyBitmessage/keys
ssh-keygen -b 4096 -P "" -C $"$(whoami)@$(hostname)-$(date -I)" -f docker-bitmessage-keys #Generate our SSH keys
ln -fs docker-bitmessage-keys.pub authorized_keys #for container to see pubkey

Build our container (sources available at Github and Docker) and we’ll make the script to handle Bitmessage to our preferences. #!/bin/bash
# filename: bitmessage
set -euxo pipefail

# open Docker container:
# port 8444 available, sharing local directories for SSH and Bitmessage data
# detatched, interactive, pseudo-tty (-dit)
# record container ID in $DID (Docker ID)
DID=$(docker run -p 8444:8444 -v ~/.config/PyBitmessage/:/root/.config/PyBitmessage -v ~/.config/PyBitmessage/keys/:/root/.ssh/ -dit j0rg3/bitmessage-gui bash)

# find IP address of new container, record in $DIP (Docker IP)
DIP=$(docker inspect $DID | grep IPAddress | cut -d '"' -f 4)

# pause for one second to allow container's SSHD to come online
sleep 1

# SSH into container and execute Bitmessage
ssh -oStrictHostKeyChecking=no -oUserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -oIdentityFile=~/.config/PyBitmessage/keys/docker-bitmessage-keys -X $DIP ./PyBitmessage/src/bitmessagemain.py

# close container if Bitmessage is closed
docker kill $DID

Okay, let’s make it executable: chmod +x bitmessage

Put a link to it where it can be picked up system-wide: ln -fs ~/docker-bitmessage/bitmessage /usr/local/bin/bitmessage

There we have it! We now have a functional Bitmessage inside a Docker container. \o/

In a future post we’ll look at using eCryptfs to further protect our Bitmessage data stores.

  Project files: Github and Docker


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Permalink: 20170217.making.a.docker.bitmessage

Mon, 17 Feb 2014

Installing INN’s Project Largo in a Docker containter

Prereqruisites: Docker, Git, SSHFS.

Today we’re going to look at using Docker to create a WordPress installation with the Project Largo parent theme and a child theme stub for us to play with.

Hart Hoover has established an image for getting a WordPress installation up and running using Docker. For whatever reason, it didn’t work for me out-of-box but we’re going to use his work to get started.

Let’s make a place to work and move into that directory:
cd ~
mkdir project.largo.wordpress.docker
cd project.largo.wordpress.docker

We’ll clone the Docker/Wordpress project. For me, it couldn’t untar the latest WordPress. So we’ll download it outside the container, untar it and modify the Dockerfile to simply pull in a copy:
git clone https://github.com/hhoover/docker-wordpress.git
cd docker-wordpress/
ME=$(whoami)
wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz
tar xvf latest.tar.gz
sed -i 's/ADD http:\/\/wordpress.org\/latest.tar.gz \/wordpress.tar.gz/ADD \.\/wordpress \/wordpress/' Dockerfile
sed -i '/RUN tar xvzf \/wordpress\.tar\.gz/d' Dockerfile

Then, build the project which may take some time.
sudo docker build -t $ME/wordpress .

If you’ve not the images ready for Docker, the process should begin with something like:
Step 0 : FROM boxcar/raring
Pulling repository boxcar/raring
32737f8072d0: Downloading [> ] 2.228 MB/149.7 MB 12m29s

And end something like:
Step 20 : CMD ["/bin/bash", "/start.sh"]
---> Running in db53e215e2fc
---> 3f3f6489c700
Successfully built 3f3f6489c700

Once the project is built, we will start it and forward ports from the container to the host system, so that the Docker container’s site can be accessed through port 8000 of the host system. So, if you want to see it from the computer that you’ve installed it on, you could go to ‘HTTP://127.0.0.1:8000’. Alternatively, if your host system is already running a webserver, we could use SSHFS to mount the container’s files within the web-space of the host system.

In this example, however, we’ll just forward the ports and mount the project locally (using SSHFS) so we can easily edit the files perhaps using a graphical IDE such as NetBeans or Eclipse.

Okay, time to start our Docker image and find its IP address (so we can mount its files):
DID=$(docker run -p 8000:80 -d $ME/wordpress)
DIP=$(docker inspect $DID | grep IPAddress | cut -d '"' -f 4)
docker logs $DID| grep 'ssh user password:' --color

Copy the SSH password and we will make a local directory to access the WordPress installation of our containter.
cd ~
mkdir largo.mount.from.docker.container
sshfs user@$DIP:/var/www $HOME/largo.mount.from.docker.container
cd largo.mount.from.docker.container
PROJECT=$(pwd -P)

Now, we can visit the WordPress installation and finish setting up. From the host machine, it should be ‘HTTP://127.0.0.1:8000’. There you can configure Title, Username, Password, et cet. and finish installing WordPress.

Now, let’s get us some Largo! Since this is a test project, we’ll sacrifice security to make things easy. Our Docker WordPress site isn’t ready for us to easily install the Largo parent theme, so we’ll make the web directory writable by everybody. Generally, this is not a practice I would condone. It’s okay while we’re experimenting but permissions are very important on live systems!

Lastly, we’ll download and install Largo and the Largo child theme stub.
ssh user@$DIP 'sudo chmod -R 777 /var/www'
wget https://github.com/INN/Largo/archive/master.zip -O $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo.zip
unzip $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo.zip -d $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/
mv $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/Largo-master $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo
wget http://largoproject.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/largo-child.zip -O $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo-child.zip
unzip $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo-child.zip -d $PROJECT/wp-content/themes
rm -rf $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/__MACOSX/

We are now ready to customize our Project Largo child theme!


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Permalink: 20140217.project.largo.docker

Wed, 15 May 2013

Git: an untracked mess?

There may be times when you find your Git repository burdened with scads of untracked files left aside while twiddling, testing bug patches, or what-have-youse.

For the especially scatter-brained among us, these things can go unchecked until a day when the useful bits of a git status scroll off the screen due to utterly unimportant stuff. Well, hopefully unimportant.

But we’d better not just cleave away everything that we haven’t checked in. You wonder:
What if there’s something important in one of those files?

You are so right!

Let’s fix this!

Firstly, we want a solution that’s reproducible. Only want to invent this wheel once, right?

Let’s begin with the play-by-play:

Git, we want a list of what isn’t tracked: git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z

We’ll back these files up in our home directory (~), using CPIO but we don’t want a poorly-named directory or finding anything will become its own obstacle. So we’ll take use the current date (date +%Y-%m-%d), directory (pwd) and branch we’re using (git branch) and we’ll twist all of it into a meaningful, but appropriate, directory name using sed. git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/

Then Tell Git to remove the untracked files and directories: git clean -d -f

Ahhhh… Much better. Is there anything left out? Perhaps. What if we decide that moving these files away was a mistake? The kind of mistake that breaks something. If we realize right away, it’s easily-enough undone. But what if we break something and don’t notice for a week or two? It’d probably be best if we had an automated script to put things back the way they were. Let’s do that.

Simple enough. We’ll just take the opposite commands and echo them into a script to be used in case of emergency.

Create the restore script (restore.sh), to excuse faulty memory: echo "(cd ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Make the restore script executable: chmod u+x ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Lastly, the magic, compressed into one line that will stop if any command does not report success: a='untracked-git-backup-'`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`; git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/$a/ && git clean -d -f && echo "(cd ~/$a/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/$a/restore.sh && chmod +x ~/$a/restore.sh; unset a


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Permalink: 20130515.git.untracked.mess