c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Sat, 04 Mar 2017

Official(ish) deep dark onion code::j0rg3 mirror

Recently I decided that I wanted my blog to be available inside of the Deep, Dark Onion (Tor).

First time around, I set up a proxy that I modified to access only the clear web version of the blog and to avail that inside Tor as a ‘hidden service’.

My blog is hosted on equipment provided by the kind folk at insomnia247.nl and I found that, within a week or so, the address of my proxy was blocked. It’s safe for us to assume that it was simply because of the outrageous popularity it received inside Tor.

By “safe for us to assume” I mean that it is highly probable that no significant harm would come from making that assumption. It would not be a correct assumption, though.

What’s more true is that within Tor things are pretty durn anonymous. Your logs will show Tor traffic coming from 127.0.0.1 only. This is a great situation for parties that would like to scan sites repeatedly looking for vulnerabilities — because you can’t block them. They can scan your site over and over and over. And the more features you have (e.g., comments, searches, any form of user input), the more attack vectors are plausible.

So why not scan endlessly? They do. Every minute of every hour.

Since insomnia247 is a provider of free shells, it is incredibly reasonable that they don’t want to take the hit for that volume of traffic. They’re providing this service to untold numbers of other users, blogs and projects.

For that reason, I decided to set up a dedicated mirror.

Works like this: my blog lives here. I have a machine at home which uses rsync to make a local copy of this blog. Immediately thereafter it rsyncs any newly gotten data up to the mirror in onionland.

After consideration, I realized that this was also a better choice just in case there is something exploitable in my blog. Instead of even risking the possibility that an attacker could get access to insomnia247, they can only get to my completely disposable VPS which has hardly anything on it except this blog and a few scripts to which I’ve already opened the source code.

I’ve not finished combing through but I’ve taken efforts to ensure it doesn’t link back to clear web. To be clear, there’s nothing inherently wrong with that. Tor users will only appear as the IP address of their exit node and should still remain anonymous. To me, it’s just onion etiquette. You let the end-user decide when they want to step outside.

To that end, the Tor mirror does not have the buttons to share to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Plus.

That being said, if you’re a lurker of those Internet back-alleys then you can find the mirror at: http://aacnshdurq6ihmcs.onion

Happy hacking, friends!


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Permalink: 20170304.deep.dark.onion

Tue, 10 Jan 2017

[-] Auxiliary failed: Msf::OptionValidateError The following options failed to validate: RHOSTS.

Mucking about with a fresh copy of Kali brings to attention that it’s packaged with an Armitage that doesn’t correctly work.

I know what you’re thinking… Good. Type the commands into Msfconsole like a real man, y’uh lazy good-fer-naught! And, in practice, that was my immediate solution. But I can’t resist a good tinker when things are misbehaving.

I was anticipating that the problem would be thoroughly solved when I ixquicked it. That was partially correct. Surprised, however, when apt-get update && apt-get upgrade didn’t fix the issue. More surprised at the age of the issue. Most surprised that I could see lots of evidence that users have been plagued by this issue — but no clear work arounds were quickly found.

Guess what we’re doing today?

Okay. The issue is quite minor but just enough to be heartbreaking to the fledgling pentester trying to get a VM off the ground.

In brief, the owner of Armitage’s Github explains:

The MSF Scans feature in Armitage parses output from Metasploit’s portscan/tcp module and uses these results to build a list of targets it should run various Metasploit auxiliary modules against. A recent-ish update to the Metasploit Framework changed the format of the portscan/tcp module output. A patch to fix this issue just needs to account for the new format of the portscan/tcp module.

That is, a colon makes it into the input for the Msfconsole command to define RHOSTS. I.e.: set RHOSTS 172.16.223.150: - 172.16.223.150

An other kind coder tweaked the regex and submitted the patch and pull request, which was successfully incorporated into the project.

Sadly, things have stalled out there. So if this problem is crippling your rig, let’s fix it!

We just want a fresh copy of the project.
root@kali:~/armitage# git clone https://github.com/rsmudge/armitage

Cloning into ‘armitage’…
remote: Counting objects: 7564, done.
remote: Total 7564 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 7564
Receiving objects: 100% (7564/7564), 47.12 MiB | 2.91 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (5608/5608), done.

Kali is Debian-based and we’re going to need Apache Ant:
root@kali:~/armitage# apt-get install ant

Then, we’ll build our new fella:
root@kali:~/armitage# cd armitage
root@kali:~/armitage# ./package.sh

Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

clean:

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 0 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:
[mkdir] Created dir: /root/test/armitage/bin

compile:
[javac] Compiling 111 source files to /root/test/armitage/bin
[javac] depend attribute is not supported by the modern compiler
[javac] Note: /root/test/armitage/src/ui/MultiFrame.java uses or overrides a deprecated API.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:deprecation for details.
[javac] Note: Some input files use unchecked or unsafe operations.
[javac] Note: Recompile with -Xlint:unchecked for details.

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 2 seconds
Buildfile: /root/test/armitage/build.xml

init:

compile:

jar:
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/sleep.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/jgraphx.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/msgpack-0.6.12-devel.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/postgresql-9.1-901.jdbc4.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[unzip] Expanding: /root/test/armitage/lib/javassist-3.15.0-GA.jar into /root/test/armitage/bin
[copy] Copying 4 files to /root/test/armitage/bin/scripts-cortana
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/armitage.jar
[jar] Building jar: /root/test/armitage/cortana.jar

BUILD SUCCESSFUL
Total time: 1 second
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
adding: readme.txt (deflated 55%)
adding: armitage.exe (deflated 49%)
adding: cortana.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: armitage.jar (deflated 5%)
adding: whatsnew.txt (deflated 65%)
armitage/
armitage/readme.txt
armitage/teamserver
armitage/cortana.jar
armitage/armitage.jar
armitage/armitage-logo.png
armitage/armitage
armitage/whatsnew.txt
Archive: ../../armitage.zip
inflating: readme.txt
inflating: armitage.exe
inflating: cortana.jar
inflating: armitage.jar
inflating: whatsnew.txt

And here, best I can guess from messages read, is where a lot of people are running into trouble. We have successfully produced our new working copy of armitage. However, it is in our own local directory and will not be run if we just enter the command: armitage

Let’s review how to figure out what we want to do about that.

First, we want to verify what happens when we run the command armitage.
root@kali:~/armitage# which armitage

/usr/bin/armitage

Good! Let’s check and see what that does!
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/bin/armitage

#!/bin/sh

cd /usr/share/armitage/
exec ./armitage “$@”

Almost there! It’s running /usr/share/armitage/armitage with whatever variables we’ve passed in. We’ll check that out.
root@kali:~/armitage# head /usr/share/armitage/armitage

#!/bin/sh
java -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar armitage.jar $@

We have enough information to assemble a solution.

I trust that the people behind Kali and Armitage will get this corrected so I don’t want to suggest a solution that would replace the armitage command and prevent an updated version from running later. So, let’s just make a temporary replacement?

root@kali:~/armitage# echo -e '#!/bin/sh\njava -XX:+AggressiveHeap -XX:+UseParallelGC -jar ~/armitage/armitage.jar $@' > /usr/bin/tmparmitage

Hereafter, we can use the command ‘tmparmitage’ (either CLI or ALT-F2) to run our fresh version until things catch up.

And, of course, to save you the time, weary hacker:

Download here:
    armitage_quick_fix.sh


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Permalink: 20170110.armitage.not.working.in.kali

Mon, 17 Feb 2014

Installing INN’s Project Largo in a Docker containter

Prereqruisites: Docker, Git, SSHFS.

Today we’re going to look at using Docker to create a WordPress installation with the Project Largo parent theme and a child theme stub for us to play with.

Hart Hoover has established an image for getting a WordPress installation up and running using Docker. For whatever reason, it didn’t work for me out-of-box but we’re going to use his work to get started.

Let’s make a place to work and move into that directory:
cd ~
mkdir project.largo.wordpress.docker
cd project.largo.wordpress.docker

We’ll clone the Docker/Wordpress project. For me, it couldn’t untar the latest WordPress. So we’ll download it outside the container, untar it and modify the Dockerfile to simply pull in a copy:
git clone https://github.com/hhoover/docker-wordpress.git
cd docker-wordpress/
ME=$(whoami)
wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz
tar xvf latest.tar.gz
sed -i 's/ADD http:\/\/wordpress.org\/latest.tar.gz \/wordpress.tar.gz/ADD \.\/wordpress \/wordpress/' Dockerfile
sed -i '/RUN tar xvzf \/wordpress\.tar\.gz/d' Dockerfile

Then, build the project which may take some time.
sudo docker build -t $ME/wordpress .

If you’ve not the images ready for Docker, the process should begin with something like:
Step 0 : FROM boxcar/raring
Pulling repository boxcar/raring
32737f8072d0: Downloading [> ] 2.228 MB/149.7 MB 12m29s

And end something like:
Step 20 : CMD ["/bin/bash", "/start.sh"]
---> Running in db53e215e2fc
---> 3f3f6489c700
Successfully built 3f3f6489c700

Once the project is built, we will start it and forward ports from the container to the host system, so that the Docker container’s site can be accessed through port 8000 of the host system. So, if you want to see it from the computer that you’ve installed it on, you could go to ‘HTTP://127.0.0.1:8000’. Alternatively, if your host system is already running a webserver, we could use SSHFS to mount the container’s files within the web-space of the host system.

In this example, however, we’ll just forward the ports and mount the project locally (using SSHFS) so we can easily edit the files perhaps using a graphical IDE such as NetBeans or Eclipse.

Okay, time to start our Docker image and find its IP address (so we can mount its files):
DID=$(docker run -p 8000:80 -d $ME/wordpress)
DIP=$(docker inspect $DID | grep IPAddress | cut -d '"' -f 4)
docker logs $DID| grep 'ssh user password:' --color

Copy the SSH password and we will make a local directory to access the WordPress installation of our containter.
cd ~
mkdir largo.mount.from.docker.container
sshfs user@$DIP:/var/www $HOME/largo.mount.from.docker.container
cd largo.mount.from.docker.container
PROJECT=$(pwd -P)

Now, we can visit the WordPress installation and finish setting up. From the host machine, it should be ‘HTTP://127.0.0.1:8000’. There you can configure Title, Username, Password, et cet. and finish installing WordPress.

Now, let’s get us some Largo! Since this is a test project, we’ll sacrifice security to make things easy. Our Docker WordPress site isn’t ready for us to easily install the Largo parent theme, so we’ll make the web directory writable by everybody. Generally, this is not a practice I would condone. It’s okay while we’re experimenting but permissions are very important on live systems!

Lastly, we’ll download and install Largo and the Largo child theme stub.
ssh user@$DIP 'sudo chmod -R 777 /var/www'
wget https://github.com/INN/Largo/archive/master.zip -O $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo.zip
unzip $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo.zip -d $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/
mv $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/Largo-master $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo
wget http://largoproject.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/largo-child.zip -O $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo-child.zip
unzip $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/largo-child.zip -d $PROJECT/wp-content/themes
rm -rf $PROJECT/wp-content/themes/__MACOSX/

We are now ready to customize our Project Largo child theme!


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Permalink: 20140217.project.largo.docker

Thu, 30 May 2013

Making ixquick your default search engine

In this writer’s opinion, it is vitally important that we take reasonable measures now to help insure anonymity, lest we create a situation where privacy no longer exists, and the simple want of, becomes suspicious.

Here’s how to configure your browser to automatically use a search engine that respects your privacy.

Chrome:

  1. Click Settings.
  2. Click “Set pages” in the “On startup” section.
  3. Enter https://ixquick.com/eng/ in the “Add a new page” text field.
  4. Click OK.
  5. Click “Manage search engines…”
  6. At the bottom of the “Search Engines” dialog, click in the “Add a new search engine” field.
  7. Enter
    ixquick
    ixquick.com
    https://ixquick.com/do/search?lui=english&language=english&cat=web&query=%s
  8. Click “Make Default”.
  9. Click “Done”.

Firefox:

  1. Click the Tools Menu.
  2. Click Options.
  3. Click the General tab.
  4. In “When Firefox Starts” dropdown, select “Show my home page”.
  5. Enter https://ixquick.com/eng/ in the “Home Page” text field.
  6. Click one of the English options here.
  7. Check box for “Start using it right away.”
  8. Click “Add”.

Opera:

  1. Click “Manage Search Engines
  2. Click “Add”
  3. Enter
    Name: ixquick
    Keyword: x
    Address: https://ixquick.com/do/search?lui=english&language=english&cat=web&query=%s
  4. Check “Use as default search engine”
  5. Click “OK”

Internet Explorer:

      _     ___  _ __        ___   _ _____ ___ 
     | |   / _ \| |\ \      / / | | |_   _|__ \
     | |  | | | | | \ \ /\ / /| | | | | |   / /
     | |__| |_| | |__\ V  V / | |_| | | |  |_| 
     |_____\___/|_____\_/\_/   \___/  |_|  (_) 
    
    
    (This is not a good strategy for privacy.)

Congratulations!

\o/

You are now one step closer to not having every motion on the Internet recorded.

This is a relatively small measure, though. You can improve your resistance to prying eyes (e.g., browser fingerprinting) by using the Torbrowser Bundle, or even better, Tails, and routing your web usage through Tor, i2p, or FreeNet.

If you would like more on subjects like anonymyzing, privacy and security then drop me a line via email or Bitmessage me: BM-2D9tDkYEJSTnEkGDKf7xYA5rUj2ihETxVR


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Permalink: 20130530.hey.you.get.offa.my.data

Mon, 20 May 2013

Debugging PHP with Xdebug

I have finished (more-or-less) making a demo for the Xdebug togglin’ add-on/extension that I’ve developed.

One hundred percent of the feedback about this project has been from Chrome users. Therefore, the Chrome extension has advanced with the new features (v2.0), allowing selective en/dis-ableing portions of Xdebug’s output. That is you can set Xdebug to firehose mode (spitting out everything) and then squelch anything not immediately needed at the browser layer. The other information remains present, hidden in the background, available if you decide that you need to have a look.

The Firefox version is still at v1.2 but will be brought up to speed as time permits.

If you want that firehose mode for Xdebug, here’s a sample of some settings for your configuration ‘.ini’ file.

The demo is here.


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Permalink: 20130520.debugging.php.with.xdebug

Wed, 15 May 2013

Git: an untracked mess?

There may be times when you find your Git repository burdened with scads of untracked files left aside while twiddling, testing bug patches, or what-have-youse.

For the especially scatter-brained among us, these things can go unchecked until a day when the useful bits of a git status scroll off the screen due to utterly unimportant stuff. Well, hopefully unimportant.

But we’d better not just cleave away everything that we haven’t checked in. You wonder:
What if there’s something important in one of those files?

You are so right!

Let’s fix this!

Firstly, we want a solution that’s reproducible. Only want to invent this wheel once, right?

Let’s begin with the play-by-play:

Git, we want a list of what isn’t tracked: git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z

We’ll back these files up in our home directory (~), using CPIO but we don’t want a poorly-named directory or finding anything will become its own obstacle. So we’ll take use the current date (date +%Y-%m-%d), directory (pwd) and branch we’re using (git branch) and we’ll twist all of it into a meaningful, but appropriate, directory name using sed. git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/

Then Tell Git to remove the untracked files and directories: git clean -d -f

Ahhhh… Much better. Is there anything left out? Perhaps. What if we decide that moving these files away was a mistake? The kind of mistake that breaks something. If we realize right away, it’s easily-enough undone. But what if we break something and don’t notice for a week or two? It’d probably be best if we had an automated script to put things back the way they were. Let’s do that.

Simple enough. We’ll just take the opposite commands and echo them into a script to be used in case of emergency.

Create the restore script (restore.sh), to excuse faulty memory: echo "(cd ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Make the restore script executable: chmod u+x ~/untracked-git-backup-`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`/restore.sh

Lastly, the magic, compressed into one line that will stop if any command does not report success: a='untracked-git-backup-'`date +%Y-%m-%d`.`pwd | sed 's,^\(.*/\)\?\([^/]*\),\2,'`.`git branch | grep "*" | sed "s/* //"`; git ls-files -o --exclude-standard -z | cpio -pmdu ~/$a/ && git clean -d -f && echo "(cd ~/$a/; find . -type f \( ! -iname 'restore.sh' \) | cpio -pdm `pwd`)" > ~/$a/restore.sh && chmod +x ~/$a/restore.sh; unset a


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Permalink: 20130515.git.untracked.mess