c0d3 :: j0rg3

A collection of tips, tricks and snips. A proud Blosxom weblog. All code. No cruft.

Thu, 13 Jul 2017

Improved Anonymity on Kali Linux

I’m not entirely certain when BackTrack/Kali began behaving more like a regular desktop distro but I seem to recall that originally, networking subsystems were down when you booted up into Run Level 3. It was up to you to turn on the interfaces and fire up a GUI if such was desired. IMO, that’s precisely how it should be. I get it. Most of us aren’t ever won’t ever find ourselves in a clandestine lot, inside of a snack and caffeine filled, non-descript, conversion van with a Yagi pointed at the bubble-window, ready to pilfer innocent datums just trying to get by in this lossy-protocoled, collision-rife, world.

Rather, very many of us just want the stinking box online so we can run through our tutorials and hack our own intentionally vulnerable VMs. A thorough taste of hacking’s un-glamorous underbelly is quite enough for many.

I’m confident that the BT fora were inundated with fledgling hackers complaining that their fresh install couldn’t find WiFi or didn’t load the desktop. However, I feel that distros dedicated to the Red Team should try to instill good habits. Having your machine boot and activate an interface announcing your presence and spewing out MAC and hostname is bad for business. Booting into a (comparatively) heavy GUI is also not where I want to begin.

Let’s imagine that we’re trying to crack into a thing. Don’t we want to apply maximal CPU resources, rather than having GUI elements bringing little beyond cost? If you notice, very many of the related tools still live on the CLI. The typical course of development (e.g.: Nmap, Metasploit) is that the CLI version is thoroughly developed before someone drops a GUI atop (respectively: Zenmap, Armitage).


So let’s take our Kali and make a few quick changes. We want to boot up in text/CLI mode and we want networking left off until we choose to make noise. Further, we want to randomize our MAC address and hostname at every boot.

We’ll use iwconfig to enumerate our wireless interfaces.
lo        no wireless extensions.

wlan1     IEEE 802.11 ESSID:"ESSID"
          Mode:Managed Frequency:2.412 GHz Access Point: 17:23:53:96:BE:67
          Bit Rate=72.2 Mb/s Tx-Power=20 dBm
          Retry short limit:7 RTS thr:off Fragment thr:off
          Encryption key:off
          Power Management:off
          Link Quality=70/70 Signal level=-21 dBm
          Rx invalid nwid:0 Rx invalid crypt:0 Rx invalid frag:0
          Tx excessive retries:253 Invalid misc:400 Missed beacon:0

eth0      no wireless extensions.

wlan0     IEEE 802.11 ESSID:off/any
          Mode:Managed Access Point: Not-Associated Tx-Power=0 dBm
          Retry short limit:7 RTS thr:off Fragment thr:off
          Encryption key:off
          Power Management:on

We have two wireless interfaces: wlan0, wlan1

Okay, first let’s configure to start up in text mode:
> systemctl set-default multi-user.target
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/default.target → /lib/systemd/system/multi-user.target.

Traditionally from text mode, we bring up the GUI desktop with the command startx. Since we don’t yet have that command, let’s create it:
> echo "systemctl start gdm3.service" > /usr/sbin/startx && chmod +x /usr/sbin/startx

Disable network-manager autostart:
> systemctl disable network-manager.service
> sed -i 's/5min/30sec/' /etc/systemd/system/network-online.target.wants/networking.service

Now, let’s randomize our hostname and MAC addresses at every boot by adding some cronjobs:
> crontab -e

We’ll add two jobs to randomize MAC address and one for our host name:
@reboot macchanger -r wlan0
@reboot macchanger -r wlan1
@reboot hostname `strings /dev/urandom | grep -o '[[:alnum:]]' | head -n 30 | tr -d '\n'`

We ‘re good! We’ve improved efficiency by staving off the GUI for when we genuinely want it and improved anonymity by randomizing some common ways of identifying the rig.


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Permalink: 2017-07-10.improved.anonymity.on.kali.linux

Tue, 07 Mar 2017

Privacy Part II: VPN/IPVanish - Install IPVanish on Kali Linux

Okay, so you’re running Whonix, Tails or, at least, TorBrowser.

What’s next? You may wish to consider using a VPN. In simple terms, it’s somewhat similar to what Tor offers. That is: you connect to the VPN and your connection passes through them such that the site that you are visiting will see the VPN’s IP address rather than yours. Of course, that means that you can chain them.

That is: (You)->VPN->Tor->Exit node->Web site

The reason that you might feel compelled to take this step is that a party which is able to see your traffic into and out of Tor could still identify you. The thinking is that the parties who wish to interfere with your privacy could be compelled to run Tor bridges, relays and exit nodes. If traffic from your IP address could be matched to requests coming from the Tor exit node then you could, effectively, be identified.

Some people hold that using a VPN to access Tor does not improve your anonymousness. I am not among them. In particular, you will find that IPVanish offers VPN service for under $7 per month and is popular among users of the Tor network. Which means that in addition to the fact that IPVanish is not logging your traffic, there’s an excellent chance that other users are going from IPVanish into Tor, helping to reduce the uniqueness of your traffic.

By the way, I’d suggest poking around the web a little bit. While their prices are already great you can find some even deeper discounts: https://signup.ipvanish.com/?aff=vpnfan-promo

IPVanish’s site offers instructions for installing the VPN in Ubuntu so we’re going to take a look at using IPVanish in Kali — including an interesting and unanticipated snag (and, of course, how to fix it).

Let’s grab the OpenVPN configuration:
wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ca.ipvanish.com.crt; wget http://www.ipvanish.com/software/configs/ipvanish-US-New-York-nyc-a01.ovpn

We will need the OpenVPN package for Gnome:
apt install network-manager-openvpn-gnome

Click on the tray in the upper right corner, then the wrench/screwdriver icon:

Select the ‘Network’ folder icon:

We’re choosing ‘Wired’ (even though we’re using wlan0 interface):

We’re setting up a VPN, of course:

Import from file:

Choose the configuration file that we downloaded previously:

Enter ‘User name’ and ‘Password’:

We are connected!

Verified at IPVanish’s site: https://www.ipvanish.com/checkIP.php

And this is where I had anticipated the installation instructions would end.

I just wanted to check a few more things. And I would love to tell you that it was simply my thoroughness and unbridled CLI-fu that led to discover that I was still making ipv6 connections outside of the VPN. Seems that it wasn’t noticed by the test at IPVanish because they deal only in ipv4. I was able to prove my ipv6 address and geolocation by using: http://whatismyipaddress.com/

Further, we can establish that the test at IPVanish is not ipv6-compatible with a quick test.

The easy fix here is to disable ipv6 locally. It is plausible that this could cause unintended consequences and, to be thorough, it would be best to handle your VPN at the firewall. Having support for OpenVPN, you’ll be able to get this running with a huge variety of routing/firewall solutions. You can grab any number of tiny computers and build a professional-quality firewall solution with something like pfSense. Maybe we’ll take a look at getting that configured in a future post.

But, for now, let’s shut down ipv6 in a way that doesn’t involve any grandiose hand-waving magic (i.e., unexplained commands which probably should work) and then test to get confidence in our results.

Let’s use sysctl to find our ipv6 kernel bits and turn them off. Then we’ll load our configuration changes. As a safety, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to look in /etc/sysctl.conf to verify that there aren’t any ipv6 configs in there.

We’ll back up our config file then turn off everything ipv6 by listing everything with the words ‘ipv6’ and ‘disable’:
cp /etc/sysctl.conf /etc/$(date +%Y-%m-%d.%H-%M-%S).sysctl.conf.bak && \
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable | sed 's/0/1/g' >> /etc/sysctl.conf && \
sysctl -p

To explain what we’re doing:
List all kernel flags; show uonly those containing the string ‘ipv6’; of those that remain, show only those that contain the string ‘disable’:
sysctl -a | grep -i ipv6 | grep disable
Replace the 0 values with 1, to turn ON the disabling, by piping output to:
sed 's/0/1/g'
That all gets stuck on the end of ‘sysctl.conf’ by redirecting stdout to append to the end of that file:
>> /etc/sysctl.conf
Then we reload with:
sysctl -p

Then as a final sanity-check we’ll make sure we can’t find any ipv6 packets sneaking about:
tcpdump -t -n -i wlan0 -s 256 -vv ip6

At this point, assuming our tcpdump doesn’t show any traffic, we should be ipv6-free with all of our ipv4 traffic shipped-off nicely through IPVanish!


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Permalink: 20170307.privacy.vpn.ipvanish

Sun, 19 Feb 2017

Privacy: perspective and primer.

Hello friends.

While the overall telos of this blog is to, generally speaking, convey code snippets and inspire the personal projects of others, today we’re going to do something a smidgeon different.

This will be a layman’s look at varied dimensions of information security from a comfortable distance. Over the years, I’ve secured servers, operating systems, medical data, networks, communications and I’ve unsecured many of these same things. The topics are too sprawling to be covered in a quick summary — but let’s find a point of entry.

Those of us who are passionate about information security are well aware of how daunting is the situation. For newcomers, it sometimes seems rather impossible. Pick any subject and there are probably well-informed and convincing experts in diametric equidistance from any “happy medium”.

Let’s imagine that (like most of us) you don’t have anything spectacular to protect. However, you dislike the idea of our ever-dissolving privacy. Therefore you want to encrypt communications. Maybe you begin to use Signal. However, there are criticisms that there is a “backdoor” (there is not). Further, there are accusations that open source projects are coded by those who can’t get real jobs. Conversely, open source projects are widely open for peer review. If it worries one enough they are free to review code themselves.

PGP can encrypt content but concerns surround algorithmic selections. Some are worried about metadata crumbs. Of course, there’s nothing preventing the frequent switching of keys and email addresses. You could use BitMessage, any number of chat solutions or drop at paste bins.

Let’s leave those concerns aside for when you’ve figured out what you’re intending to protect. These arguments surround any subject in information security and we’re not going to investigate them on a case by case basis. Least, not in this post.

At the coarsest granularity, the question is analogous to the practicality of locking your doors or sealing your post envelopes. Should I take measures toward privacy?

My opinion is rather predictable: of course you should!

There’s a very pragmatic explanation. If there ever comes a day when you should like to communicate privately, that’s a terrible time to start learning.

Take the easy road and start using some of the myriad tools and services available.

Should you decide to take InfoSec seriously, you’ll need to define a threat model.
That is: What am I protecting? From whom am I protecting? (e.g. what are probable attack vectors?)

That’s where you need to make choices about trusting products, protocols, methods, algorithms, companies, servers, et cet. Those are all exciting subjects to explore but all too often brushing up against them can be exasperating and cause premature burn-out.

That in mind, let’s employ the philosophy that any effort toward security is better than none and take a look at a few points where one might get wetted-toes.

If you have questions or want specific advice, there are several ways below to initiate a secure conversation with me.

 

Secure your browser:

  • Privacy Badger: Block tracking
  • HTTPS Everywhere: Increase your encryptioning
  • uBlock: Advertisements are for others
  •  

    Secure communications:

  • Mailvelope: PGP email encryption for your major webmail provider (e.g., Gmail) | contact | pubkey
  • Tutanota: Encrypted webmail | Kontakt
  • Protonmail: Well-established provider of PGP encrypted webmail, featuring 2FA | kontakta
  • BitMessage: P2P encrypted communications protocol | contact: BM-2D9tDkYEJSTnEkGDKf7xYA5rUj2ihETxVR | Bitmessage channel list
  •   [ Bitmessage in a Docker container ]

  • BitMessage.ch: BitMessage email gateway | contact
  • BitMsg.me: Online BitMessage service
  • Keybase.io: Keybase maps your identity to your public keys, and vice versa
  • Signal: PGP encrypted TXT messages
  • Wire: Encrypted chat, video and calls
  • RIOT: Open-source, IRC-based, Matrix; run your own server
  • Wickr: Encrypted ephemeral chat
  •   [ n.b. Wickr’s .deb package seeks a unicode library (libicu52) which is not available to a recent Kali (or anything) install; .deb file is based on Ubuntu’s 2014 LTS release. Wickr in a Docker container ]

     

    Explore alternate nets (e.g., Deep Web, Dark Net):

  • MaidSafe: Promising new alt-web project
  • Qubes: a reasonably secure operating system
  • FreeNet: Alt-net based primarily on already knowing with whom you intend to collaborate
  • Bitmask: VPN solution to anonymize your traffic
  • TAILS: A live operating system based on the Tor network
  • TorBrowser: Stand-alone browser for Tor (less secure than TAILS)
  • Whonix: the most secure (and complex) way to access the Tor network
  • i2p: an other approach to creating a secure and private alternate web
  • Morph.is: fun alt-net, aimed at producing The World Brain. Although, it’s future looks a lot less promising since the lead dev was killed.
  • ZeroNet: one more encrypted anonymous net
  • Have fun and compute safely!


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    Permalink: 20170219.privacy.prespective.primer

    Sat, 18 Feb 2017

    The making of a Docker: Part II - Wickr: with bonus analysis

    Recently, I read a rather excited attention-catching piece about how Wickr is the super-secure version of Slack. Attention caught in part because I feel like Wickr has been around for a while. I’d not seen anyone raving about its security in places where I normally interact with those who are highly informed about such subjects.

    Good is that it seems the folk at Wickr did a fine job of making sure valuable data aren’t left behind.
    The bad: closed-source, not subject to independent review; crazy marketin’-fancy-talk without a thorough description of how it does what is claimed.
    Any time I’m looking at a product or service that boasts security, I sort of expect to see a threat model.

    [ Update: At the time I was working on this project, the folk at Wickr were, evidently, opening their source. That’s spectacular news! Check it out on Github. ]

    This began as an exercise to provide another piece of security-ish software in a Docker container. Anyone who has used a live distro (e.g., Kali, TAILS) with any regularity knows the ritual of installing favorite tools at each boot, data stores on removable media.

    For me, there is tremendous appeal in reducing that to something like:
    git clone https://georgeglarson/wickr
    cd docker-wickr
    ./install.sh
    wickr

    Let’s dig in!

    Having created a number of Docker containers my workflow is to queue up the base OS and go through the steps needed to get the software running while keeping careful notes. In this case, I had originally tried to install Wickr on a current copy of Kali. It was already known that Wickr, based off of Ubuntu 14.04, needed an older unicode library. So we begin with Ubuntu 14.04.

    Grab a copy of Wickr and see what’s required:
    dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

    new debian package, version 2.0.
    size 78890218 bytes: control archive=4813 bytes.
    558 bytes, 14 lines control
    558 bytes, 14 lines control64
    10808 bytes, 140 lines md5sums
    Package: wickr-me
    Architecture: amd64
    Section: net
    Priority: optional
    Version: 2.6.0-4
    Replaces: wickr
    Conflicts: wickr
    Depends: libsqlcipher0, libuuid1, libicu52, libavutil52|libavutil54, libc6, libssl1.0.0, libx264-142, libglib2.0-0, libpulse0, libxrender1, libgl1-mesa-glx
    Recommends: libnotify-bin, gstreamer-plugins0.10-good, gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad, gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly
    Maintainer: Wickr Inc.
    Installed-Size: 200000
    Description: Secure Internet Chat and Media Exchange agent
    Wickr is a secure communications client

    Okay. The CLI should do most of the work for us, giving a formatted list of dependencies.
    dpkg -I wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb | grep -E "^ Depends: | Recommends: " | sed -e "s/ Depends: //" -e "s/ Recommends: //" -e "s/,//g" -e "s/ / \\\ \n/g"

    libsqlcipher0 \
    libuuid1 \
    libicu52 \
    libavutil54 \
    libc6 \
    libssl1.0.0 \
    libx264-142 \
    libglib2.0-0 \
    libpulse0 \
    libxrender1 \
    libgl1-mesa-glx
    libnotify-bin \
    gstreamer-plugins0.10-good \
    gstreamer-plugins0.10-bad \
    gstreamer-plugins0.10-ugly \

    Attempting to get those with apt-get reports that it cannot find the gstreamer bits.

    Let’s find:
    apt-cache search gstreamer | grep -i plugin | grep -E "good|bad|ugly"

    gstreamer0.10-plugins-good - GStreamer plugins from the "good" set
    ...
    gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad - GStreamer plugins from the "bad" set
    ...
    gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly - GStreamer plugins from the "ugly" set

    So, there’s the format we need to get the gstreamer dependencies. We know that we’ll also want SSH and wget. That should be enough for our Dockerfile.

    We’ll pull down Wickr:
    wget https://dls.wickr.com/Downloads/wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

    Then install:
    dpkg -i wickr-me_2.6.0_amd64.deb

    Okay! We are, in theory, ready to run Wickr. We’re about to see we aren’t yet there — but these sorts of problems are pretty commonplace.
    wickr-me

    wickr-me: error while loading shared libraries: libxslt.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

    Huh! We need libxslt. Let’s fix that: apt-get install libxslt1-dev

    Now we can run it.
    wickr-me

    This application failed to start because it could not find or load the Qt platform plugin "xcb".

    Available platform plugins are: eglfs, linuxfb, minimal, minimalegl, offscreen, xcb.

    Reinstalling the application may fix this problem.
    Aborted (core dumped)

    One more: apt-get install xcb

    Okay. That really was the last one. Now we have a complete list of dependencies for our Dockerfile:
    RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y \
    gstreamer0.10-plugins-good \
    gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad \
    gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly \
    libsqlcipher0 \
    libuuid1 \
    libicu52 \
    libavutil52 \
    libc6 \
    libssl1.0.0 \
    libx264-142 \
    libglib2.0-0 \
    libpulse0 \
    libxrender1 \
    libxslt1-dev \
    libgl1-mesa-glx \
    libnotify-bin \
    ssh \
    wget \
    xcb \
    && apt-get clean \

    We now have Wickr in a Docker container and, because we are the curious sort, need to peek into what’s happening.

    A natural first step is to set Wireshark atop Wickr. At a glance, seems to be communicating with a single IP address (204.232.166.114) via HTTPS.

    Unsurprsingly, the client communicates to the server whenever a message is sent. Further it appears to poll the same address periodically asking for new messages. We see that the address resolves to Rackspace in San Antonio, TX.

    We can easily establish the link between this IP address, Rackspace and the application.

    Well, that’s enough. Right?

    Good!

    Wait.

    What?

    We’re still a little curious.

    Aren’t we?

    I mean, what’s the big question here? What happens if there’s a man in the middle? Persons so eagerly connect to any free WIFI, it is clearly a plausible scenario. Well… One way to find out!

    Here’s what we learned. Server-side, the application is written in PHP. The IP address is resolved by the URI ‘secex.info’.

    When we send, it calls ‘postMessage.php’:

    When we receive, ‘downloadMessage.php’:

    And it calls ‘newMessageCheck.php’ to, y’know, check for new messages.

    Other analyses have forensically examined artefacts left behind; there are published descriptions of the encryption methods used for the local database connection. We didn’t go into more aggressive efforts such as disassembly because we are too lazy for that jazz!

    My opinion, we didn’t learn anything wildly unexpected. Overall, Wickr seems an okay solution for convenient encrypted messaging. That’s always the trade: convenience vs. security. Least we ended with a Docker container for the software!

    Github | Docker


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    Permalink: 20170218.making.a.docker.wickr

    Sun, 13 Jul 2014

    Simple Protection with iptables, ipset and Blacklists

    Seems I’ve always just a few more things going on than I can comfortably handle. One of those is an innocent little server holding the beginnings of a new project.

    If you expose a server to the Internet, very quickly your ports are getting scanned and tested. If you’ve an SSH server, there are going to be attempts to login as ‘root’ which is why it is ubiquitously advised that you disable root login. Also why many advise against allowing passwords at all.

    We could talk for days about improvements; it’s usually not difficult to introduce some form of two-factor authentication (2FA) for sensitive points of entry such as SSH. You can install monitoring software like Logwatch which can summarize important points from your logs, such as: who has logged via SSH, how many times root was used, etc.

    DenyHosts and Fail2ban are very great ways to secure things, according to your needs.

    DenyHosts works primarily with SSH and asks very little from you in way of configuration, especially if you’re using a package manager to install a version that is configured for the distribution on which you’re working. If you’re installing from source you may need to find where are your SSH logs (e.g., /var/log/secure, /var/log/auth.log). It’s extremely easy to set up DenyHosts to synchronize so that you’re automatically blocking widely-known offenders whether or not they’re after your server.

    In contrast, Fail2ban is going to take more work to get set up. However, it is extremely configurable and works with any log file you point it toward which means that it can watch anything (e.g., FTP, web traffic, mail traffic). You define your own jails which means you can ban problematic IP addresses according to preference. Ban bad HTTP attempts from HTTP only or stick their noses in the virtual corner and don’t accept any traffic from them until they’ve served their time-out by completely disallowing their traffic. You can even use Fail2ban to scan its own logs, so repeating offenders can be locked out for longer.

    Today we’re going to assume that you’ve a new server that shouldn’t be seeing any traffic except from you and any others involved in the project. In that case, you probably want to block traffic pretty aggressively. If you’ve physical access to the server (or the ability to work with staff at the datacenter) then it’s better to err in the direction of accidentally blocking good guys than trying to be overly fault-tolerant.

    The server we’re working on today is a Debian Wheezy system. It has become a common misconception that Ubuntu and Debian are, intents and purposes, interchangeable. They’re similar in many respects and Ubuntu is great preparation for using Debian but they are not the same. The differences, I think, won’t matter for this exercise but I am unsure because this was written using Wheezy.

    Several minutes after bringing my new server online, I started seeing noise in the logs. I was still getting set up and really didn’t want to stop and take protective measures but there’s no point in securing a server after its been compromised. The default Fail2ban configuration was too forgiving for my use. It was scanning for 10 minutes and banning for 10 minutes. Since only a few people should be accessing this server, there’s no reason for anyone to be trying a different password every 15 minutes (for hours).

    I found a ‘close-enough’ script and modified it. Here, we’ll deal with a simplified version.

    First, lets create a name for these ne’er-do-wells in iptables:
    iptables -N bad_traffic

    For this one, we’ll use Perl. We’ll look at our Apache log files to find people sniffing ‘round and we’ll block their traffic. Specifically, we’re going to check Apache’s ‘error.log’ for the phrases ‘File does not exist’ and ‘client denied by server configuration’ and block people causing those errors. This would be excessive for servers intended to serve the general populace. For a personal project, it works just fine as a ‘DO NOT DISTURB’ sign.


    #!/usr/bin/env perl
    use strict;
    use POSIX qw(strftime);

    my $log = ($ARGV[0] ? $ARGV[0] : "/var/log/apache2/error.log");
    my $chain = ($ARGV[1] ? $ARGV[1] : "bad_traffic");

    my @bad = `grep -iE 'File does not exist|client denied by server configuration' $log |cut -f8 -d" " | sed 's/]//' | sort -u`;
    my @ablk = `/sbin/iptables -S $chain|grep DROP|awk '{print $4}'|cut -d"/" -f1`;

    foreach my $ip (@bad) {
    if (!grep $_ eq $ip, @ablk) {
    chomp $ip;
    `/sbin/iptables -A $chain -s $ip -j DROP`;
    print strftime("%b %d %T",localtime(time))." badht: blocked bad HTTP traffic from: $ip\n";
    }
    }

    That gives us some great, utterly unforgiving, blockage. Looking at the IP addresses attempting to pry, I noticed that most of them were on at least one of the popular block-lists.

    So let’s make use of some of those block-lists! I found a program intended to apply those lists locally but, of course, it didn’t work for me. Here’s a similar program; this one will use ipset for managing the block-list though only minor changes would be needed to use iptables as above:

    #!/bin/bash
    IP_TMP=ip.tmp
    IP_BLACKLIST_TMP=ip-blacklist.tmp

    IP_BLACKLIST=ip-blacklist.conf

    WIZ_LISTS="chinese nigerian russian lacnic exploited-servers"

    BLACKLISTS=(
    "http://danger.rulez.sk/projects/bruteforceblocker/blist.php" # BruteForceBlocker IP List
    "http://rules.emergingthreats.net/blockrules/compromised-ips.txt" # Emerging Threats - Compromised IPs
    "http://www.spamhaus.org/drop/drop.txt" # Spamhaus Don't Route Or Peer List (DROP)
    "http://www.spamhaus.org/drop/edrop.txt" # Spamhaus Don't Route Or Peer List (DROP) Extended
    "http://cinsscore.com/list/ci-badguys.txt" # C.I. Army Malicious IP List
    "http://www.openbl.org/lists/base.txt" # OpenBL.org 90 day List
    "http://www.autoshun.org/files/shunlist.csv" # Autoshun Shun List
    "http://lists.blocklist.de/lists/all.txt" # blocklist.de attackers
    )

    for address in "${BLACKLISTS[@]}"
    do
    echo -e "\nFetching $address\n"
    curl "$address" >> $IP_TMP
    done

    for list in $WIZ_LISTS
    do
    wget "http://www.wizcrafts.net/$list-iptables-blocklist.html" -O - >> $IP_TMP
    done

    wget 'http://wget-mirrors.uceprotect.net/rbldnsd-all/dnsbl-3.uceprotect.net.gz' -O - | gunzip | tee -a $IP_TMP

    grep -o '^[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}[/][0-9]\{1,3\}' $IP_TMP | tee -a $IP_BLACKLIST_TMP
    grep -o '^[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}[^/]' $IP_TMP | tee -a $IP_BLACKLIST_TMP

    sed -i 's/\t//g' $IP_BLACKLIST_TMP
    sort -u $IP_BLACKLIST_TMP | tee $IP_BLACKLIST

    rm $IP_TMP
    rm $IP_BLACKLIST_TMP

    wc -l $IP_BLACKLIST

    if hash ipset 2>/dev/null
    then
    ipset flush bloxlist
    while IFS= read -r ip
    do
    ipset add bloxlist $ip
    done < $IP_BLACKLIST
    else
    echo -e '\nipset not found\n'
    echo -e "\nYour bloxlist file is: $IP_BLACKLIST\n"
    fi


    Download here:
        bad_traffic.pl
        bloxlist.sh


    Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
    Permalink: 20140713.simple.protection.with.iptables.ipset.and.blacklilsts

    Tue, 18 Mar 2014

    Random datums with Random.org

    I was reading about the vulnerability in the ‘random’ number generator in iOS 7 (http://threatpost.com/weak-random-number-generator-threatens-ios-7-kernel-exploit-mitigations/104757) and thought I would share a method that I’ve used. Though, I certainly was not on any version of iOS but, at least, I can help in GNU/Linux and BSDs.

    What if we want to get some random numbers or strings? We need a salt or something and, in the interest of best practices, we’re trying to restrain the trust given to any single participant in the chain. That is, we do not want to generate the random data from the server that we are on. Let’s make it somewhere else!

    YEAH! I know, right? Where to get a random data can be a headache-inducing challenge. Alas! The noble people at Random.org are using atmospheric noise to provide randomness for us regular folk!

    Let’s head over and ask for some randomness:
    https://www.random.org/strings/?num=1&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=html&rnd=new

    Great! Still feels a little plain. What if big brother saw the string coming over and knew what I was doing? I mean, aside from the fact that I could easily wrap the string with other data of my choosing.

    Random.org is really generous with the random data, so why don’t we take advantage of that? Instead of asking for a single string, let’s ask for several. Nobunny will know which one I picked, except for me!

    We’ll do that by increasing the 'num' part of the request that we’re sending:
    https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=html&rnd=new

    They were also thinking of CLI geeks like us with the 'format' variable. We set that to 'plain' and all the fancy formatting for human eyes is dropped and we get a simple list that we don’t need to use any clever tricks to parse!
    curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new'

    Now we’ve got 25 strings at the CLI. We can pick one to copy and paste. But what if we don’t want to do the picking? Well, we can use the local system to do that. We’ll have it pick a number between 1 and 25. It’s zero-indexed, so we’re going to increment by 1 so that our number is really between 1 and 25.
    echo $(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 ))

    Next, we’ll send our list to head with our random number. Head is going to give us the first X lines of what we send to it. So if our random number is 17, then it will give us the first 17 lines from Random.org
    curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new' | head -$(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 ))

    After that, we’ll use the friend of head: tail. We’ll tell tail that we want only the last record of the list, of psuedo-random length, of strings that are random.
    curl -s 'https://www.random.org/strings/?num=25&len=16&digits=on&loweralpha=on&unique=on&format=plain&rnd=new' | head -$(( (RANDOM % 25)+1 )) | tail -1

    And we can walk away feeling pretty good about having gotten some properly random data for our needs!


    Tags: ,
    Permalink: 20140318.random.data

    Thu, 06 Jun 2013

    Managing to use man pages through simple CLI tips

    Recently, an author I admire and time-honored spinner of the Interwebs, Tony Lawrence emphasized the value of using man pagesmanual pagesDocumentation available from the command line.
    > man ls
    as a sanity check before getting carried away with powerful commands. I didn’t know about this one but he has written about a situation in which killall could produce some shocking, and potentially quite unpleasant, results.

    Personally, I often quickly check man pages to be certain that I am using the correct flags or, as in the above case, anticipating results that bear some resemblance to what is actually likely to happen. Yet, it seems many people flock toward SERPSearch Engine Results Page A tasteful replacement for mentioning any particular search-engine by name.
    Also useful as a verb:
    I dunno. You’ll have to SERP it.
    s for this information.

    Perhaps the most compelling reason to head for the web is leaving the cursor amid the line you’re working on, without disturbing the command. SERPing the command however, could easily lead you to information about a variant that is more common than the one available to you. More importantly, the information retrieved from the search engine is almost certainly written by someone who did read the man page — and may even come with the admonishment that you RTFMRead The F#!$!*#’n Manual as a testament to the importance of developing this habit.

    This can be made easier with just a few CLI shortcuts.

    <CTRL+u> to cut what you have typed so far and <CTRL+y> to paste it back.

    That is, you press <CTRL+u> and the line will be cleared, so you can then type man {command} and read the documentation. Don’t hesitate to jot quick notes of which flags you intend to use, if needed. Then exit the man page, press <CTRL+y> and finish typing right where you left off.

    This is another good use for screen or tmux but let’s face it. There are times when you don’t want the overhead of opening another window for a quick look-up and even instances when these tools aren’t available.

    A few other tips to make life easier when building complex commands:

    Use the command fc to open up an editor in which you can build your complex command and, optionally, even save it as a shell script for future reuse.

    Repeat the last word from the previous command (often a filename) with <ALT+.> or use an item from the last command by position, in reverse order:
    > ls -lahtr *archive*
    <ALT+1+.> : *archive*
    <ALT+2+.> : -lahtr
    <ALT+3+.> : ls

    You can also use Word Designators to use items from history, such as adding sudo to the last command typed by:
    sudo !!

    This allows for tricks like replacing bits of a previous command:
    !:s/misspelled/corrected/

    Lastly, if you need a command that was typed earlier, you can search history by pressing <CTRL+r> and start typing an identifying portion of the command.

    (Note: I have used these in Zsh and Bash, specifically. They can, however, be missing or overwritten — if a feature you want isn’t working, you can bind keys in a configuration file. Don’t just write it off, once you’ve solved the problem it will never again be an intimidating one.)

    Happy hacking!


    Tags: , , , , , , , ,
    Permalink: 20130606.managing.to.use.man.pages

    Tue, 07 May 2013

    Welcome, traveler.

    Thanks for visiting my little spot on the web. This is a Blosxom ‘blog which, for those who don’t know, is a CGI written in Perl using the file-system (rather than a database).

    To the CLI-addicted, this is an awesome little product. Accepting, of course, that you’re going to get under the hood if you’re going to make it the product you want. After some modules and hacking, I’m pleased with the result.

    My posts are just text files, meaning I start a new one like: vim ~posts/`date +%Y%m%d`.brief.subject.txt

    Note: the back-ticks (`) tell the system that you want to execute the command between ticks, and dynamically insert its output into the command. In this case, the command date with these parameters:
    1. (+) we’re going to specify a format
    2. (%Y) four-digit year
    3. (%m) two-digit month
    4. (%d) two-digit day
    That means the command above will use Vim to edit a text file named ‘20130507.brief.subject.txt’ in the directory I have assigned to the hash of ‘posts’. (using hash this way is a function of Zsh that I’ll cover in another post)

    In my CLI-oriented ‘blog, I can sprinkle in my own HTML or use common notation like wrapping a word in underscores to have it underlined, forward-slashes for italics and asterisks for bold.

    Toss in a line that identifies tags and, since Perl is the beast of Regex, we pick up the tags and make them links, meta-tags, etc.

    Things here are likely to change a lot at first, while I twiddle with CSS and hack away at making a Blosxom that perfectly fits my tastes — so don’t be too alarmed if you visit and things look a tad wonky. It just means that I’m tinkering.

    Once the saw-horses have been tucked away, I’m going to take the various notes I’ve made during my years in IT and write them out, in a very simple breakdown, aimed at sharing these with people who know little about how to negotiate the command line. The assumption here is that you have an interest in *nix/BSD. If you’ve that and the CLI is not a major part of your computing experience, it probably will be at some point. If you’re working on systems remotely, graphical interfaces often just impede you.

    Once you’ve started working on remote machines, the rest is inevitable. You can either remember how to do everything two ways, through a graphical interface and CLI — or just start using the CLI for everything.

    So let’s take a little journey through the kinds of things that make me love the CLI.


    Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
    Permalink: 20130507.greetings